In Memoriam: Edna Barker (1952-2019)

Edna Jean Barker

Edna Barker (1952-2019), Toronto Small Press Book Fair, June 19, 2010 | Photo by Don McLeod

Wordsmith, editor, sister, friend

Edna died on April 24, 2019 of assisted suicide, ending years struggling with a rare form of dementia that gradually robbed her of her vision, language and cognitive skills, and her ability to ride her beloved bike. Edna was my proofreading boss at Harlequin Books in 1976-77 and my good friend for 43 years. She was one of 26 co-founders of FEAC, now Editors Canada, in 1979, serving as secretary and advocate. She also advocated for Casey House and gay rights. Few realized how many dying friends with AIDs she cared for over the years. She advocated building more bike lanes, public libraries, and small houses, like the 12 that she’d owned and renovated on an editor’s salary. The best was the union hall on Barker Avenue, which she turned into a studio/home, and its backyard, into a big vegetable garden. Continue reading

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Note to readers

Due to a research and writing project on NATO and a move to Toronto, I have been posting on an irregular basis since February-March. However, during the forthcoming period, be ready for a tsunami of articles. Although the principle focus of this site is international relations and Canada’s military and foreign policy, along with questions of disinformation, the media and history, it also acts as a resource centre on Atlantic Canada. We will be reposting articles on current struggles of the workers in that region, principally from Workers’ Forum. In addition we will be soon reposting scores of articles and reports on the Maritimes from the 1970s, 1980s and 1990s, written either by myself or my colleagues in the party press, so that one can either have an overview of the entire period of what took place and was achieved, or find historical information on a particular topic. All these articles will be dated according to their original publication date, so they will not be featured on the “Recent Posts” sidebar on the front page.

Please continue to send us your reports, photos and comments, and keep up to date with the CPC(M-L) website and calendars of events for important announcements.

I am grateful for your interest and support.

Best wishes,

Tony Seed

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What is the US Helms-Burton Act? How will it affect Canada?

Interview with Isaac Saney, Co-Chair and Spokesperson, Canadian Network on Cuba

Vancouver monthly picket, April 17, 2019, demands end to blockade of Cuba.

The U.S. Helms-Burton Act was conceived to codify and tighten the economic, commercial and financial blockade imposed on Cuba in 1962 for the purpose of subverting and overthrowing the Cuban government and imposing a regime to the liking of the U.S. government.

TML Weekly interviewed Isaac Saney, Co-Chair and Spokesperson of the Canadian Network on Cuba (CNC), to explain for readers what is the Helms-Burton Act and its Title III and what is at stake. Continue reading

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Canadian Network on Cuba calls on Ottawa to reopen visa office in Cuba

Canada and the International Rule of Law

By ISAAC SANEY, Spokesperson

The Canadian Network on Cuba (CNC) is deeply concerned by Ottawa’s abrupt decision to shut down the section of its Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship (IRCC) Office in Havana through which visas were processed for Cuban citizens wishing to visit Canada and those seeking work or study permits. This measure follows the 50 per cent reduction of the staff of Canada’s embassy in Cuba which took place in January of this year. Cubans now have to make their applications through a visa application centre in a third country (the nearest being Mexico). Those having to submit their biometrics (photo and fingerprints), a requirement instituted in 2018 that will apply to most, will have to travel to a centre outside of Cuba to record this information. Continue reading

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US sanctions violate human rights and international code of conduct

Illegal economic sanctions as collective punishment

UN Office of the High Commissioner on Human Rights

NO-helms-burtonAn independent expert appointed by the Human Rights Council [of the United Nations] has expressed deep concern at the recent imposition of unilateral coercive measures on Cuba, Venezuela and Iran by the United States, saying the use of economic sanctions for political purposes violates human rights and the norms of international behaviour. Such action may precipitate man-made humanitarian catastrophes of unprecedented proportions. Continue reading

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Huawei statement following Meng Wanzhou case management hearing

Email Internet spyingOn May 8, a Huawei executive issued a statement on the steps of the BC Supreme Court following the latest hearing regarding the Meng Wanzhou extradition case.

Benjamin Howes, Vice President of Media Affairs at Huawei said:

“From the outset, Huawei has expressed confidence in Ms. Meng’s innocence. We have maintained that her U.S.-ordered arrest was an unlawful abuse of process – one guided by political considerations and tactics, not by the rule of law. Continue reading

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This Day. 100th Anniversary of the Winnipeg General Strike

Canadian workers’ proud history of organized resistance and defence of rights

1919.06.04.WinnipeggeneralstrikeMinStOutsideHomeofCitizensCtte2cr2

Rally June 4, 1919, outside the building which housed the citizen’s committee.

This year marks the 100th Anniversary of the Winnipeg General Strike. On May First 1919, discouraged by post-war inflation and unemployment, Winnipeg’s metal and building workers went on strike, demanding higher wages. Winnipeg’s building trade workers walked out to gain better wages and hours. They were joined by iron workers who were fighting for company recognition of their union, the Metal Trades Council. On May 15, with the overwhelming support of its 12,000 members, the Winnipeg Labour Council called a general strike. Thirty thousand union and non-union people walked off the job. Among the first out were the city’s telephone workers. Winnipeg had no phone service for a week.  Continue reading

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