Category Archives: Asia

74th anniversary of nuclear bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki

No More Hiroshimas! No More Nagasakis!

Today marks the 74th anniversary of the dropping of atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. On the morning of August 6, 1945, the United States dropped an atom bomb that exploded above the Japanese city of Hiroshima killing about 140,000 people in the initial blast, in total more than 237,000. Three days after the Hiroshima bombing, the United States dropped another atomic bomb on the southern Japanese city of Nagasaki killing 8,500 people and eventually resulting in the deaths of more than 70,000 people due to exposure to radiation and injuries. Continue reading

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Warship watch: Canada’s naval role in US-led aggression against the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea

The role of Canada’s military in enforcing unjust and deadly sanctions against the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK) is of great concern. These activities come at a time the peoples of the world are opposing foreign intervention in all its forms and are calling for peaceful, diplomatic means to resolve issues within and between countries. The high-handed U.S.-led sanctions against the DPRK undermine the achievement of conditions conducive to inter-Korean relations and peace negotiations between the U.S. and DPRK, and are blocking them from going further. Continue reading

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Filed under Asia, Canada, Canadian Forces, Central America, Uncategorized

War by other means: The violence of North Korean human rights

By CHRISTINE HONG

1. Victors’ Justice?

In February 2014, upon completing a several-month investigation into “human rights in the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea [DPRK, or North Korea]” – an investigation initiated in the sixtieth anniversary year of the 1953 Korean War Armistice Agreement that halted combat but did not end the war – the three-member Commission of Inquiry (COI) established by the United Nations Human Rights Council (UNHRC) concluded that North Korea had committed crimes against humanity. Such “unspeakable atrocities,” in the framing account of Commission chair Michael Kirby, “reveal a totalitarian State [without] parallel in the contemporary world.”[1] Analogies to the “dark abyss” of North Korea, the Australian jurist maintained, could be found only in the brutality of the Third Reich, South African apartheid, and the Khmer Rouge regime.[2] Reproduced in news reports around the world, Kirby’s markedly ahistorical examples may have succeeded in inflaming global public opinion yet they failed to contextualize the issue of North Korean human rights in a way that might generate peaceful structural resolution. Indeed, insofar as the 372-page COI report singularly identified the North Korea government as the problem – both as “a remaining and shameful scourge that afflicts the world today,” in Kirby’s jingoistic phrase, and as the primary obstacle to peace in Korea – the Commission gave new life to the vision of regime change that has animated post-9/11 North Korean human rights campaigns. By recommending that North Korea and its high officials be brought up before the Hague-based International Criminal Court (ICC), it continued the hostilities of the unresolved Korean War “by means purporting to be judicial.”[3] The urgent question of a long-deferred peace relative to the Korean peninsula, which the Commission incoherently addressed, bedeviled its conclusions, rendering its findings partial, its recommendations in some instances uneasily one-sided, and its premise of impartiality suspect.[4] Moreover, that the COI proceedings and report aligned the United Nations with the United States, South Korea, Japan, and Great Britain while singling out North Korea and, to a far lesser degree, China, for blame performed an unsettling restaging of the Korean War on the agonistic terrain of human rights, suggesting an encrypted “victor’s justice” with regard to an unending war that up to now has had no clear winners.[5] Continue reading

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Event. For Peace, Security and Denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula 

Public Forum in Toronto on June 15

For Peace, Security and Denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula

Toronto
Saturday, June 15 – 2:00-6:00 pm
TNG Community Centre, 349 Ontario Street
Organized by: Korea Truth Commission (Canadian Chapter) and Korean Federation in Canada
For more information call 416-768-1107 or email: corfedca@yahoo.ca

Keynote Speaker: Professor Kiyul Chung, 21st Century Institute, Washington, DC; Distinguished Visiting Professor, Kim Il Sung University, Pyongyang, DPRK Continue reading

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Important meeting in June to discuss the developments on the Korean Peninsula

Toronto
Saturday June 15, 2019 — 2:00-6:00 pm
TNG Community Centre, 349 Ontario Street

Keynote Speaker: Professor Kiyul Chung, 21st. Century Institute, Washington D.C.
Associate Professor, Kim Il Sung University, Pyongyang, DPRK

Everyone is warmly invited to a public forum on the struggle for peace, security and denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula on the occasion of the 19th anniversary of the historic June 2000 North-South Joint Declaration signed by the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK) and the Republic of Korea (ROK). Continue reading

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Vietnam: The big winner at the US-DPRK Summit

By Alberto Salazar Gutierrez

Hanoi, Mar 2 (Prensa Latina) – The much-expected second Summit between Donald Trump and Kim Jong Un concluded on Thursday here without agreements, but it was not Vietnam”s fault: the scenario deserved significant rapprochement between the United States and North Korea. Things went as planned, but Vietnam, as a country, and Hanoi, as the venue of the meeting, can rest assured that they created all conditions to get more results. Continue reading

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Developments on the Korean Peninsula: Second DPRK-US summit being held in Vietnam 

2019.02.24-VietnamHanoi-SummitPrep-01

  • Summit Preparations and Agenda
  • Developments Since DPRK-U.S. Singapore Summit
  • Deepening of Inter-Korean Relations
  • Attempt to Sabotage Peace Efforts 

Developments on the Korean Peninsula: Second DPRK-U.S. Summit to be held in Vietnam

TML Daily (February 25) – The second summit between Chairman Kim Jong Un, the leader of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK), and U.S. President Donald Trump will take place February 27-28, in Hanoi, Vietnam. A second summit has been in the offing since last fall, and the dates were confirmed by President Trump in his February 5 State of the Union Speech.[1] Continue reading

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