Category Archives: History

German President rewrites history of Babi Yar massacre: Making the perpetrators look like victims

Monument to Soviet citizens and POWs at the ravine at Babi Yar.

By Christelle Néant

During his visit to Ukraine to inaugurate a memorial dedicated to the victims of the Babi Yar massacre, German President Frank-Walter Steinmeier literally rewrote the history of the massacre of tens of thousands of Jews, and made Ukrainian collaborators of the Nazis look like victims.

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80th Anniversary of Nazi atrocities committed at Babi Yar

September 29-30, 1941 – November 6, 1943

Monuments at Babi Yar, left to right: to Jews; to Soviet citizens and POWS; to Roma; to children.

This year marks the 80th anniversary of the war crimes and crimes against humanity committed at Babi Yar by the Nazis and their Ukrainian collaborators in their campaign against the Soviet Union during World War II. They are said to be the worst committed up to that time, surpassed by even greater crimes committed by the Nazis after that.

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This day. The 1961 massacre of Algerians in Paris: When the media failed the test

Freedom of press of the reactionary ruling classes

Carte.ParisAlgeriecleIn 1961 and for years after, the French and Anglo-American media colluded with the state to cover up the 1961 massacre of Algerians in Paris, ensuring impunity for those responsible for this heinous crime such as the Nazi collaborator Maurice Papon, Prefect of the Paris police. This is an apt time to recall what happened. Continue reading

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This Day. Anniversary of the Proclamation of War Measures in 1970

Police powers unjustly imprisoned hundreds uring 1970 “October Crisis”

Army deployed on the streets of Montreal October 15, 1970, the day before the War Measures Act is invoked.

October 16 marks the 51st anniversary of the proclamation of the War Measures Act by Pierre Elliott Trudeau and his Liberal government. Trudeau declared a state of “apprehended insurrection” in order to use the powers of the War Measures Act, which had been used in World War I and World War II, to indefinitely detain people without charges or trial.

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100th Anniversary of Battle of Blair Mountain, W. Virginia – August 25-September 2, 1921

Remembering the heroic miners of the Battle of Blair Mountain

The Marxist-Leninist Party of Canada remembers with great affection the workers throughout North America who have given their lives, been injured or sent to prison in the many battles for the dignity of labour and for a nation-building project to build the new without class oppression and exploitation.

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This Day. The assassination of Alexander Zakharchenko

Exactly three years ago, on August 31, 2018, the head of Donetsk People’s Republic in Eastern Ukraine, Alexander Zakharchenko, was assassinated.

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English ‘civilization’ and Braveheart

National Wallace Monument and Ochil Hills in autumn | Ray Mann, Wikipedia

710 years ago on August 23, 1305, the English overlords executed the great Scottish patriot, William Wallace (Uilleam Uallas).

Although vastly outnumbered, especially in cavalry, Wallace and Andrew Moray’s Scottish army had historically defeated a much larger English army at the Battle of Stirling Bridge on September 11, 1297.

After the victory, Wallace styled himself as “Commander of the Army of the Kingdom of Scotland” and the Guardian of the Kingdom of Scotland. Although he utilized the term kingdom instead of nation, Wallace was not simply protecting a throne for an absentee ruler, he was protecting the independence of Scotland. As historian J.M. Reid observes, “Wallace [was] the champion of a rising of a people in its own defence.” [1]

After eight more years of skirmishing and battling with the English forces, on August 5, 1305, Wallace was betrayed and captured near Glasgow. He was handed over to King Edward I of England, who charged him with high treason. Wallace’s reply to the charge was, “I could not be a traitor to Edward, for I was never his subject.”

In a ceremony fit for barbarians, Wallace was dragged naked through the streets of London, then hanged, drawn, and quartered, and his body parts sent to various parts of the kingdom as a warning to other “rebels.”

In 1869 the National Wallace Monument was erected, very close to the site of his army’s glorious victory at Stirling Bridge.

Note

1.W. Croft Dickinson, Scotland from the Earliest Times to 1603, 3rd ed., Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1977, 155-59; J.M. Reid, Scotland’s Progress: The Survival of a Nation, London: Eyre & Spottiswoode, 1971, 64.)

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Canada’s anti-communist crusade: Black Ribbon Day – More anti-communist glorification of Nazism

1942 photo of RCAF pilots from Torbay Air Force base in Newfoundland, some of the over one million Canadians who enlisted to fight fascism during the second world war.

On August 23, the Ukrainian Canadian Congress, Latvian, Estonian and other reactionary cliques are once again staging events to mark the anniversary of so-called Black Ribbon Day. “Commemorative events” are being held on Parliament Hill, the Rotunda of the Alberta Legislature, and a handful of other locales. In concert, Trudeau did not fail to issue a statement on Twitter, equating the victims of fascism with the so-called victims of communism and falsifying history. Scores of Canadians immediately began denouncing his statement on Twitter.

For the information of readers, we have updated an article by Dougal MacDonald originally published by this blog on August 24, 2018 which provides information on the so-called Black Ribbon Day.

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Celebrate Vietnam’s National Day

August 22 Virtual Celebration

76th Anniversary of August Revolution and Vietnam National Day

Sunday August 22, 2021 — 7:00 pm EDT
Organized by the Canada-Vietnam Friendship Society
To register or for more information contact: info@c-vfs.com
Advance registration is required. Those registering will receive a non-transferable link to join the celebration.

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India: Farmers’ fight for the rights of all continues unabated

Farmers hold their Kisan Sansad (Farmers Parliament) in Jantar Mantar in New Delhi.

By Jaspal Singh

The fight of the farmers in India to repeal three anti-farm laws and for their rights continues unabated with more and more initiatives being taken by the farmers, while the government’s attempts to defeat them meet one failure after another.

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August 15, 1947: 75th Anniversary of the Independence of India

Farmers mark Indian Independence Day with tractor rallies and protests. Photo above of arrival at the Singhu border in Delh

August 15 is the 75th anniversary of the Independence of India which the ruling class is celebrating with pomp and ceremony, but not in the spirit of the people.

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Hardial Bains – A Man of Revolutionary Action

82nd Anniversary of the Birth of Hardial Bains, August 15, 1939

Hardial Bains
On August 15, we celebrate the birth, life and work of Hardial Bains, founder and leader of the Communist Party of Canada (Marxist-Leninist). Hardial Bains was, above all else, a man of revolutionary action. He came to Canada as a youth from India in 1959 and immediately integrated with the life of the working people in British Columbia and took up the struggles of the student youth with whom he shared weal and woe.
• Hardial Bains – A Man of Revolutionary Action
• A Biographical Sketch

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Honour to the life and work of the legendary leader of the Cuban people

Cuba today, which has withstood so much yet contributes so much to the well-being of humanity, is a testament to Fidel’s vision for humanity.

On the 95th Anniversary of the Birth of Fidel Castro, August 13, 1926

August 13, 2021 marks the 95th anniversary of the birth of Fidel Castro, the legendary leader of the Cuban people and hero to oppressed peoples the world over. On this occasion, the Communist Party of Canada (Marxist-Leninist) sends warmest greetings to the Cuban people and their leadership who live out the call Somos Fidel! (We Are Fidel!) and carry forward the revolutionary struggle embodied by Fidel. Although Fidel died nearly five years ago, the strength of the all-sided socialist nation-building project that he founded and led can be seen in Cuba today as a new generation of Cubans heroically defends the Revolution from the stepped-up criminal and inhumane economic blockade and attempts at counterrevolution by the U.S. imperialists, in the midst of a global pandemic.

Cuba today, which has withstood so much yet contributes so much to the well-being of humanity, is a testament to Fidel’s vision for humanity. Cuba embodies a project which permits the human personality to flourish and practices human rights by upholding the right of a people to exercise control over their destiny.

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Fiji sings

For a moment, hierarchies (historical, economic, political) are turned upside down. It is a brief glimpse of the day when the last shall be first | A Reflection by Tony Seed

Fiji song
Jerry Tuwai, captain of Team Fiji, sings on the podium with his team mates after receiving their gold medals following victory in the Rugby Sevens Men’s Gold Medal match between New Zealand and Fiji on day five of the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games at Tokyo Stadium on July 28, 2021 in Chofu, Tokyo, Japan | Dan Mullan/Getty Images

(August 3) – You must be watching the Olympics. Did you chance to watch any of the Rugby Sevens matches?

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77th Anniversary of the Start of the Warsaw Uprising August 1, 1944

The Treachery of Historical Falsifications | Dougal MacDonald

Monument in Warsaw, inaugurated in 1989, to those who fought in the 1944 Warsaw Uprising

Much has been written by historians about the Warsaw Uprising in Poland which took place from August 1 to October 2, 1944, during the Second World War.[1] Much of it is false. The main aims of the past and modern falsifiers of the history of the Warsaw Uprising have been to attack the Soviet Union and its great leader, Joseph Stalin, to whitewash the Polish reactionaries and their modern-day descendants, and to try to pretend that the innumerable Nazi war crimes which were committed against the Polish people were a mere historical footnote. But the facts of history are stubborn things and they do not change just because of the scribblings of reactionary historians.

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Signing of Armistice in the Korean War, July 27, 1953

U.S. Must Stop All Provocations Against the DPRK and Sign a Peace Treaty Now!

Korean People’s Army celebrates victory

By Nick Lin and Philip Fernandez

On July 27, the Korean people, as well as peace-loving humanity will celebrate the 68th anniversary of the signing of the Korean Armistice Agreement between the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK) and the United States in 1953 which brought a ceasefire to the Korean War, known in the DPRK as the Great Fatherland Liberation War. The signing of the Armistice Agreement also signalled the first military defeat of the U.S. following the Second World War — a humiliation which has haunted the U.S. imperialists ever since, and for which it has yet to forgive the DPRK and the Korean people.

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Ancient fossilized fish found in Egypt that survived in hot waters

Fossilized fish dating back 56 million years have been discovered in Egypt’s Eastern Desert, shedding light on a time period when Earth was experiencing massive warming | ALAA OMRAN

Remains of an early whale from 40-million years ago lies on the desert pavement of Wadi El-Hutan, 100 kilometers south of Cairo. About 400 skeletons of ancient water life: mammals, reptiles have been identified in what used to be an ancient shoreline.

Remains of an early whale from 40 million years ago lies on the desert pavement of Wadi El-Hutan, 100 km south of Cairo. About 400 skeletons of ancient water life such as mammals and reptiles have been identified in what used to be an ancient shoreline | CRIS BOURONCLE/AFP via Getty ImagesAlaa Omran

CAIRO (June 16) — An Egyptian research team that includes Egypt’s Mansoura and Tanta universities, the American University of Cairo and the University of Michigan recently discovered the remains of vertebrate fossils from sediments dating back 56 million years at a site in Egypt’s Eastern Desert.

The scientific journal Geology published last month the details of the discovery of creatures that withstood highly elevated global temperatures at a site that is today in the Egyptian desert.

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4,000-year-old city discovered in Iraq

A group of Russian archaeologists made an impressive discovery in Iraq’s Dhi Qar governorate, where an ancient settlement about 4,000 years old was found.

A woman walks toward the Great Ziggurat Temple, a massive Sumerian stepped mudbrick construction dedicated to the moon god Nanna that dates back to 2100 B.C. in the ancient city of Ur, Dhi Qar province, Iraq, June 15, 2020.
A woman walks toward the Great Ziggurat Temple, a massive Sumerian stepped mudbrick construction dedicated to the moon god Nanna that dates back to 2100 B.C. in the ancient city of Ur, Dhi Qar province, Iraq, June 15, 2020 | Asaad Niazi/AFP via Getty Images

A woman walks toward the Great Ziggurat Temple, a massive Sumerian stepped mudbrick construction dedicated to the moon god Nanna that dates back to 2100 B.C. in the ancient city of Ur, Dhi Qar province, Iraq, June 15, 2020 | Asaad Niazi/AFP via Getty Images

By Adnan Abu Zeed

(July 9) – A group of Russian archaeologists discovered June 24 an ancient settlement about 4,000 years old in Dhi Qar governorate in southern Iraq. The discovery was made in the area of Tell al-Duhaila, which is home to more than 1,200 archaeological sites, including the Great Ziggurat of Ur site from the Sumerian era, and the royal tomb. Treasures similar to the ones that were found in the tomb of Egypt’s Tutankhamun’ tomb were unearthed.

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68th Anniversary of Moncada Attack, July 26, 1953

July 26 marks one of the most important dates celebrated in Cuba, Moncada Day or the National Day of Rebellion. It was on July 26, 1953 that revolutionary youth led by Fidel Castro launched their courageous attack on the Batista dictatorship which led to the ultimate liberation of Cuba on January 1, 1959. To this day, this bold action symbolizes the revolutionary spirit and audacity of the Cuban people. The following three articles on its significance are provided by the editorial team of the The Marxist-Leninist (TML) and originally published on July 26, 2021.

• Stand with the Cuban People and Their Revolution!
• Fidel: “Moncada Taught Us to Turn Setbacks into Victories”
• An Event That Changed the Course of History – Granma

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Germany: An enduring enemy of the Palestinian struggle

Germany’s contribution to the colonisation of Palestine over the years has been ideological, financial, physical and military | JOSEPH MASSAD*

German President Frank-Walter Steinmeier meets Israeli Prime Minister Naftali Bennett in Jerusalem on July 1, 2021 | AFP

(July 16) – German President Frank-Walter Steinmeier visited Israel two weeks ago and met Prime Minister Naftali Bennett, whose American parents came from San Francisco to colonise Palestine in July 1967. Bennett has boasted: “I’ve killed lots of Arabs in my life and there’s no problem with that.”  

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Over 160 unmarked graves confirmed near site of Kuper Island Industrial School in BC

(July 14) – The Penelakut Tribe is one of six tribes of the Penelakut First Nation whose traditional territories include parts of southern Vancouver Island and of some of the southern Gulf islands in the Salish Sea between Vancouver Island and the BC mainland. On July 8 Penelakut Tribe Chief Joan Brown, Council and Elders issued an invitation to join in their work to raise awareness of the Kuper Island Industrial School and to inform people of the confirmation of more than 160 undocumented and unmarked graves near the site.

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This Day. Postal workers launched a 42-day strike for paid maternity leave

A July 11, 1981 demonstration in Edmonton, Alberta | CUPW/AUPW.

1981 (30 June): Forty years ago, 23,000 postal workers in the Canadian Union of Postal Workers (CUPW) launched a 42-day strike for paid maternity leave and other just demands. They had already held wildcat strikes in 1965 against sexual harassment and for better pay. In fact, the wildcats of ’65 were the main reason why the Canadian government institutionalized collective bargaining for public servants in 1967.

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Of perpetrators, victims and collaborators (III)

Eighty years ago, Nazi criminals and Nazi collaborators started the first pogroms and murders of Jews in the Baltic States. Baltic collaborators are hounored today as “freedom fighters”. This fascist glorification is enabled by Canada and the United States who present themselves as the greatest opponents of “anti-semitism”. Third in a series.

Rally in Riga, Latvia opposes the annual march to rehabilitate Latvian members of the Nazi’s Waffen SS, March 16, 2017.

BERLIN (german-foreign-policy.com) – In the shadow of the invading Wehrmacht, German Nazi criminals started the first pogroms and mass murders of the Soviet Union’s Jewish population exactly 80 years ago together with Central and Eastern European collaborators. On June 24, 80 years ago, for example, pogroms began in the Lithuanian city of Kaunas under the eyes of Wehrmacht soldiers, in which German and Lithuanian perpetrators fell victim to 3,800 Jews by June 29.

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June 24 – Celebration of Quebec’s National Day

The celebration of Quebec National Day includes the celebration of our 19th century patriots who fought to establish an independent homeland and republic which vests sovereignty in the people. – Youth for Democratic Renewal

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June 23, 1990 – Defeat of Meech Lake Accord

Democratic Renewal and a Modern Constitution Are an Urgent Need – The significance of the Meech Lake Accord today is that in this era the people want to be the arbiters and decision-makers. It is the work for democratic renewal which will open society’s path to progress.

On June 23, 1990, the Meech Lake Accord was defeated. It was a set of amendments to the Constitution of Canada negotiated behind closed doors in 1987 by Prime Minister Brian Mulroney and the provincial premiers. The failure of the Meech Lake Accord marked a deepening of the constitutional crisis which has now become an existential crisis due to Canada’s all-sided integration into the U.S. war economy and state arrangements.

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Of perpetrators, victims and collaborators (II)

Ukraine honours Nazi-collaborators, who, 80 years ago today, participated in the invasion of the Soviet Union and carried out massacres of Jews. This fascist glorification is enabled by Canada, the United States and Germany who present themselves as the greatest opponents of “anti-semitism”.

Stepan Bandera (in the centre) in Nazi uniform

BERLIN/KIEV (german-foreign-policy.com) – Whereas the German invasion of the Soviet Union 80 years ago is being internationally commemorated today, collaborators, who participated in the war of annihilation on the side of the Germans, are receiving state honours in Ukraine, in particular the Organization of Ukrainian Nationalists (OUN) and its leader Stepan Bandera as well as the Ukrainian Insurgent Army (UPA) which originated from that milieu. Together with the German Wehrmacht and troops from several collaborating states, OUN militias advanced onto Soviet territory, where they committed countless massacres of the Jewish population alongside German units. In Lviv (formerly Lemberg), 4000 Jews were assassinated within a very short period. The parliament in Kiev declared the OUN “combatants for Ukrainian independence.” A government decree calls for honouring their “patriotism” and “high morals” in Ukrainian schools. The UPA’s founding day has been a national holiday since 2015. The OUN salute adorns Ukraine’s football League’s jerseys.

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Of perpetrators, victims and collaborators (I)

80th anniversary of the invasion of the Soviet Union: No commemoration by the German government, and Bundestag, German President under attack because of his commemoration address in the Karlshorst Museum.

One of the first antifascist leaflets issued in the Soviet Union right after the Nazi invasion on June 22, 1941. The text reads: “Each German soldier on Eastern front is doomed to death.”

BERLIN/MOSCOW (german-foreign-policy.com) – The German invasion of the Soviet Union 80 years ago will be internationally commemorated on Tuesday – without any participation by the German government or the Bundestag. This invasion marked the beginning of the German war of annihilation’s key phase that had cost the lives of 27 million Soviet citizens, devastated large parts of the country and exposed the Jewish population to German crimes of extermination. The Bundestag should hold no special commemoration, but instead maintain an “undivided commemoration of the entire course of the Second World War,” explained Wolfgang Schäuble, President of the Bundestag. Several members of the Bundestag used a “debate” on the war of annihilation to demand that “German crimes” not lead to restraint regarding aggression against today’s Russia. Foreign Minister Heiko Maas has Soviet victims of the war of annihilation disappear among the victims of “Central and Eastern Europe” – a choice of terms that conflates Nazi victims and Nazi collaborators: Significant forces from “Central and Eastern Europe” played an active role in the German war of annihilation.

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June 21: Summer Solstice — National Indigenous Peoples Day

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Juneteenth and the end of slavery

Juneteenth is being celebrated by demanding that all the continuing remnants of slavery, in the form of broad inequality faced by African Americans on all fronts and police violence and mass incarceration be eliminated. People of all nationalities and backgrounds together continue to affirm their convictions for new arrangements and their own empowerment, through protests as well as other forms of resistance.

By Dougal MacDonald

June 19, 1865 or Juneteenth (also known as Freedom Day) is celebrated across the United States in appreciation of the vital contributions made by African Americans in emancipating the four million people enslaved by the system of slave labour and in carrying forward the fight for justice and equality before and since the U.S. Civil War. Recent actions across the U.S. salute the determined and undaunted resistance to police violence, government impunity, and demands for accountability and for change that favours the people.

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Against the genocidal British partition of 1947: At the farmers’ encampments in India

June 5, 2021. Farmers marching in Amritsar, Punjab.

(June 10) – On June 3, farmers at the encampments surrounding Delhi marked the 74th anniversary of the proclamation of the partition of India by the British. On June 3, 1947, the last British Viceroy of India, Lord Mountbatten, declared that India would be partitioned into two dominions. Muhammad Ali Jinnah, leader of the All-India Muslim League, spoke after him and accepted the partition of India and creation of the Dominion of Pakistan. Then came Jawaharlal Nehru whose acceptance of partition made him the first Prime Minister of India. So too, Baldev Singh claimed to represent the Punjabi Sikh community in the processes of negotiations that resulted in the Partition of India in 1947, for which he became the first Minister of Defence of India. The Congress laid claim to secularism but nonetheless demanded that Punjab and Bengal also be divided on the basis of religion. Leaders of the Communist Party of India had already accepted partition and all the parties conspired with the British against the peoples of India. June 2 marks the date when Mountbatten presented the plans for the partition of India to all these people and they accepted it. Mahatma Gandhi, who had been saying, “partition over my dead body,” told Mountbatten that he had vowed to maintain silence and would not oppose it.

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