Tag Archives: Boethuk

Message given the Queen on her 1997 visit to Newfoundland

SHESHATSHIU, CANADA: As Queen Elizabeth II’s motorcade drives by, an Innu woman holds up a sign protesting Canada’s claim to their lands in Sheshatshiu, Newfoundland during the Queen’s 26 June 1997 visit. AFP PHOTO/CARLO ALLEGRI

As is well known, in Newfoundland the genocide of the Beothuk Indigenous people occurred due to the slave trade and brutal treatment carried out by colonial powers of which the English set the pattern, something the Indigenous peoples have repeatedly raised. 

Queen Elizabeth II visited Labrador in 1997 to mark the quincentennial anniversary of the “discovery” of Newfoundland by the Venetian John Cabot (Giovanni Caboto), who was commissioned by Henry VII of England.

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Reports of a sanitized “royal tour”

Royal jubilee tours’ stop in Canada not welcome

Bronze statue of Shanawdithit, believed to be the last of the Beothuk, stands at Boyd’s Cove on Newfoundland’s northeast coast.

Charles and Camilla arrived in St. John’s, Newfoundland on May 17 with an official welcome by the Prime Minister and Governor General and inspection of a guard of honour, a prayer in Inuktitut, Innu drumming and Mi’kmaq music, and visit to the place called “Government House.” It is called “Government House” even though it is the residence of the Lt. Governor of Newfoundland and Labrador who represents the British Crown – a constant reminder that Canada’s institutions pay obeyance to a foreign monarch. There a ceremony in memory of Indigenous victims and survivors of residential schools was held. Then a meeting with Campaign for Wool Canada and a visit to Quidi Vidi, a former fishing village, artisans and a brewery. They then left for Ottawa.

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Vikings spread smallpox around the world 1,400 years ago

A thousand years before the great epidemics

Viking bones from 1,400 years ago

Researchers found the oldest smallpox strain in the teeth of Vikings, the remains of which were recently discovered. Now the Covid-19 travels faster. Continue reading

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The ‘New Found Land’ and Heroic Resistance of the Mi’kmaq and Beothuk

‘Discovery’ of New Found Land and Cape Breton: Who was Caboto and what was his claim on Canada? Plus:
• Why Canada Was Called a “Dominion”

• Letters Patent Issued to John Cabot and the Royal Prerogative

The Royal Charter to the Hudson’s Bay Company

• The Royal Family


Mi’kmaq resistance carries on to the present. Above, they militantly defend their hereditary rights blocking a fracking operation near Rexton, New Brunswick, October 7, 2013.

By TONY SEED*

The Venetian navigator Giovanni Caboto (John Cabot), commissioned by Henry VII of England, landed in Newfoundland on June 24, 1497. Believing it to be an island off the coast of Asia, he named it New Found Land.[1]

Under the commission of this king to “subdue, occupy, and possesse” the lands of “heathens and infidels,” Caboto reconnoitred the Newfoundland coast and also landed on the northern shore of Cape Breton Island in Nova Scotia.[2]

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This Day. ‘Discovery’ of New Found Land and Cape Breton: Who was Caboto and what was his claim on Canada?

The Venetian navigator Giovanni Caboto (John Cabot), commissioned by Henry VII of England, landed in Newfoundland, on June 24, 1497 believing it to be an island off the coast of Asia and named it New Found Land. [1] Under the commission of this king to “conquer, occupy, and possess” the lands of “heathens and infidels”, Caboto reconnoitred the Newfoundland coast and also landed on the northern shore of Cape Breton Island in Nova Scotia. [2]

He returned to England on August 6 and took three Mi’kmaq with him, thereby introducing slavery into North America. This may be responsible for his disappearance when he returned to Newfoundland with five ships in 1498. When his ships arrived in northern Cape Breton Island, the Mí’kmaq attacked. Only one ship returned to England, the other four, with Caboto as Captain, never returned. Continue reading

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