Tag Archives: British colonialism

This Day. June 24, 1497 – Britain’s ‘Dominion, Title and Jurisdiction‘ of Canada begins

Indigenous resistance to colonialism continues in the present, including Mi’kmaq defence of their hereditary rights against fracking on their traditional territories.

By Tony Seed

On June 24, 1497, the Venetian navigator Giovanni Caboto (John Cabot), commissioned by Henry VII of England, landed in Newfoundland. Believing it to be an island off the coast of Asia, he named it New Found Land. Under the commission of this king to “conquer, occupy, and possess” the lands of “heathens and infidels,” Caboto reconnoitred the Newfoundland coast and landed on the northern shore of what is today known as Cape Breton Island in Nova Scotia. Continue reading

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Canada Day 2022: Conception of Rights in Canada’s Constitution

The conception of rights enshrined in the current Constitution of Canada dates back to the days of the British conquest and rebellions against it. It is a conception that enshrines and protects the rights of the Crown with institutions, values, aims and practices established for that purpose. Before that, the French Crown also imposed laws and practices in defence of private property which also contributed to shaping the country’s future.

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Inquest exposes British army murder of Irish mother as legacy fight continues in London

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A Derry mother was shot dead by a British soldier in her back garden in circumstances which were “unjustified”, a coroner has ruled.

Kathleen Thompson, a mother of six, was killed by a bullet fired into the chest in Derry, Northern Ireland, on November 6 1971.

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Red letter day for the Irish language

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A new sense of empowerment was evident in the largest ever demonstration for Irish language rights in Belfast last weekend, as up to 20,000 people demanded overdue legislation to protect the rights of Irish speakers under British rule.

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Barbados declares itself a republic. Yes! It can be done!

Ceremony swearing in Dame Sandra Mason as Barbados’ first President, November 29, 2021.

For the information of readers, we are reposting two articles on the declaration of Barbados, November 30, 2021 that it will become a republic.

Renewal Update

Today, November 30, Barbados became a Republic. The Republic of Barbados was declared at a ceremony late in the evening on November 29 at the National Heroes Square in the capital, Bridgetown, to coincide with the anniversary of Barbados’ formal independence from Britain, 55 years ago.

With this action, Barbados has become the fourth of Britain’s previous colonies in the Caribbean to become a republic, following Guyana, Trinidad and Tobago and Dominica which have had already taken this path forward.

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Peoples of the Caribbean give ‘working royals’ a fitting reception

The visits in March and April of the so-called working members of the British royal family to Commonwealth “realms” were shocking for their display of racist condescension, extravagant living and wasteful expenditures. | Margaret Villamizar

Protest in Jamaica against the Royal Visit, March 23, 2022.

Organized to mark Queen Elizabeth II’s 70 years on the English throne, these “Platinum Jubilee” tours to the 14 former British colonies that retain the British monarch as their official head of state have taken different members of the “House of Windsor” to six Caribbean countries, Australia and Papua New Guinea. The latest such tour brought “heir to the throne” Charles and his wife Camilla Parker Bowles to Canada from May 17 to 19.

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Message given the Queen on her 1997 visit to Newfoundland

SHESHATSHIU, CANADA: As Queen Elizabeth II’s motorcade drives by, an Innu woman holds up a sign protesting Canada’s claim to their lands in Sheshatshiu, Newfoundland during the Queen’s 26 June 1997 visit. AFP PHOTO/CARLO ALLEGRI

As is well known, in Newfoundland the genocide of the Beothuk Indigenous people occurred due to the slave trade and brutal treatment carried out by colonial powers of which the English set the pattern, something the Indigenous peoples have repeatedly raised. 

Queen Elizabeth II visited Labrador in June, 1997 to mark the quincentennial anniversary of the “discovery” of Newfoundland by the Venetian John Cabot (Giovanni Caboto), who was commissioned by Henry VII of England.

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Royal family’s fortune from the slave trade

From the enslavement and deportation of the Irish to British colonies in Oceania and the West Indies to the kidnapping of Africans, the British Crown made much of their vast personal wealth from the human slave trade. Every monarch and their family from Elizabeth Tudor onwards were financiers and beneficiaries of this trade in human flesh.

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Victoria Day – Empower yourself now

Statue of Queen Victoria, symbol of colonial rule, toppled in front of Manitoba legislature during Cancel Canada Day action, July 1, 2021.

May 23, the third Monday in May, is officially slated as Victoria Day. This has been the case since 1845 when the birthday of Queen Victoria was celebrated and, at one time was officially called Imperial Day. Since then, it is used in England to celebrate the reigning monarch, no matter when they were actually born. In this sense, it is an out-dated practice which Quebeckers had the good sense to name Patriot’s Day to celebrate the rebellion against British rule in 1837-38. For Ontarians, it marks the beginning of good weather. Before climate change, when weather was more predictable, it used to mean that the ground was no longer frozen so planting could start and also that plants would no longer be subject to frosts.

But the fact remains that Canada’s institutions are tied to an anachronistic system. The recent visit to Canada of the so-called heir to the throne, Prince Charles, and his wife Camilla Parker Bowles was, in fact, to celebrate the jubilee platinum anniversary of the Queen’s reign. Pictures of her jubilee celebrations in England featured the more than £1000 gowns worn by members of the Royal Household as it is called – a reminder that those who rule over the people definitely live in another world that has nothing to do with the majority except for the fact that they carry its burden on their backs – a burden we must break with in order to renew the democracy in Canada so that it is set by the people and favours their interests, not the interests of the likes of the “Royals” and their retinues comprised of the party governments that keep them going.

Laura Chesnick, Independent candidate in Windsor-Tecumseh in the Ontario election

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Queen Victoria – The Famine Queen

On the Occasion of Imperial Day (now called Victoria Day)

Recently campaigns have been underway in Ireland, like that in Cork, to remove the name Queen Victoria, known as the “Famine Queen”, from street signs. That her main statue at Leinster House in Dublin survived until 1948 (26 years after the creation of the Free State) is something of a miracle. She was monarch when Ireland was beset by a famine organized by rich English and Irish landowners and millions starved or emigrated. After gathering dust in Ireland for some years, Victoria got a trip to Sydney, Australia to be “planted” outside the Queen Victoria Building, despite some bids from Canadian buyers. Writing in the Irish Times, Myles na gCopaleen (Brian O’Nolan/Flann O’Brien) the following month was not overly bothered with its removal – her statutes were more harmful than her statues, as he put it. “Besides, look at it this way,” he wrote. “Time has given the mere Irish their revenge. The fact is that Victoria has turned green. Of hue she approaches our decent Irish letterbox. And it is the price of her.”

Excerpt from Tony Seed, Signs of Change in Ireland

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Conception of Rights in Canada’s Constitutions of 1840, 1867 and 1982

185th Anniversary of 1837-38 Rebellions in Lower and Upper Canada

Patriots led by Wolfred Nelson defeat British troops at the Battle of Saint-Denis.

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High time Canadians renounce the monarchy and everything it brings with it

British Royals’ “Jubilee Tour”

Statue of Queen Victoria, symbol of colonial rule, toppled in front of Manitoba legislature during Cancel Canada Day action, July 1, 2021. A statue of Queen Elizabeth was also taken down.

The little “Jubilee Tour” to Canada of the so-called Working Royals – Charles, who ruling elites presume to be the future King of Canada, and his wife Camilla – illustrates that it is high time Canadians renounce the monarchy and everything it brings with it.

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Anniversary of the 1837-38 Rebellion – Quebec Patriots’ Day

185th Anniversary of 1837-38 Rebellions in Lower and Upper Canada. May 23rd is Quebec Patriots’ Day.

Assembly of the Six Counties on October 23 and October 24, 1837, a gathering of some 6,000 Patriots held in Saint-Charles, Lower Canada, in defiance of a British proclamation forbidding public assemblies.

Nation-Building Project of Quebec Patriots

National Patriots’ Day marks the 1837-1838 uprising to honour the memory of the Patriots who gave their lives or were forced into exile in the struggle to end British colonial rule by establishing a Republic of Quebec.

Patriots’ Day celebrates the striving of the people to affirm their right to be. Beginning in the spring of 1837, when the British Crown formally rejected the demands of the Legislative Assembly of Lower Canada included in the 92 Resolutions of 1834, numerous mass meetings broke out across Quebec where the people spoke and demanded their democratic rights.

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Poll shows Canadians do not care for monarchy

Royal jubilee tours’ stop in Canada not welcome

The latest Angus Reid poll confirms that 51 per cent of respondents are in favour of abolishing the monarchy in the generations to come, while 24 per cent of respondents are unsure. Files from news agencies report the following:

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The rest of the wasteful and farcical tour

Royal jubilee tours’ stop in Canada not welcome

Heritage Canada announced that during the visit of Prince Charles and Camilla to Ottawa on May 18, Charles will be invested as an Extraordinary Commander of the Order of Military Merit by the Governor General, lay a wreath at the National War Memorial, then meet with the Ukrainian Canadian Congress.

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Reports of a sanitized “royal tour”

Royal jubilee tours’ stop in Canada not welcome

Bronze statue of Shanawdithit, believed to be the last of the Beothuk, stands at Boyd’s Cove on Newfoundland’s northeast coast.

Charles and Camilla arrived in St. John’s, Newfoundland on May 17 with an official welcome by the Prime Minister and Governor General and inspection of a guard of honour, a prayer in Inuktitut, Innu drumming and Mi’kmaq music, and visit to the place called “Government House.” It is called “Government House” even though it is the residence of the Lt. Governor of Newfoundland and Labrador who represents the British Crown – a constant reminder that Canada’s institutions pay obeyance to a foreign monarch. There a ceremony in memory of Indigenous victims and survivors of residential schools was held. Then a meeting with Campaign for Wool Canada and a visit to Quidi Vidi, a former fishing village, artisans and a brewery. They then left for Ottawa.

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High time Canadians renounced the monarchy!

The heir to the English throne Prince Charles and his wife Camilla Parker Bowles are visiting Canada from May 17 to 19. They are called “working Royals.” These are members of the British Royal Family who live off the wealth produced by the British working people and Crown holdings, and on this basis are paid to represent the Royal Family. The Trudeau government’s ministry called Heritage Canada announced that they are visiting three cities — St. John’s, Newfoundland and Labrador, Ottawa and Yellowknife, Northwest Territories. It is all part of a ” platinum jubilee tour” to mark the current monarch’s 70 years on the English throne. The so-called working members of the British royal family have been dispatched to visit the 14 Commonwealth “realms” — former British colonies that retain the British monarch as their official head of state. These “Platinum Jubilee” tours have so far taken different members of the House of Windsor to six Caribbean countries, Australia and Papua New Guinea, and now, the Prince of Wales and Duchess of Cornwall have arrived in Canada.

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A powerful weapon in Britain’s ‘dirty war’ against the Irish: The Ulster Defence Regiment

Declassified files have revealed the shocking level of collusion between the British Army’s UDR regiment and loyalists. Micheál Smith is the author of a new book on the subject (for the Irish Times).

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For some, the conflict in Northern Ireland was characterised by an impenetrable jumble of abbreviations. Amid the alphabet soup of loyalist paramilitary groups – the UVF, LVF, UDA, etc – some might mistakenly include the UDR. But the Ulster Defence Regiment was in fact a fully-fledged element of the British army.

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Unwelcome guests stalk the Caribbean

The website of the Caribbean Organisation for Peoples Empowerment on April 27, 2022, carried this article by A T Freeman headed: It’s time to end these demeaning ”royal visits”


Protesters in St Vincent and Grenadines at the arrival of The Earl and the Countess of Wessex. Photo: Kenton X Chance/I-Witness News

Once again the people of the Caribbean are being subjected to another “visit” from members of Britain’s royal family. This current visit sees the British queen’s youngest son Edward and his wife Sophie’s visit to St Vincent and the Grenadines, St Lucia and Antigua and Barbuda after they postponed the Grenada leg of their trip. It follows on closely from the visit of the queen’s grandson William and his wife, Katherine, to Belize, Jamaica and the Bahamas in March.

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April 13, 1919 – Anniversary of the Jallianwala Bagh Massacre in Punjab

At the festival of Baisaki, the Sikh New Year, on April 13, 1919, the British opened fire on men, women and children in Amritsar, massacring more than 1,000 and injuring many more. The Jallianwala Bagh Massacre went down in history as one of the most heinous crimes of British rule. Today the site commemorates all those who were murdered there under British orders.

Commemorations at Jallianwala Bagh, April 13, 2019, honouring the 100th anniversary of those martyred by the British colonialists.

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105th anniversary of Battle of Vimy Ridge April 9-12, 1917: Canada must never again provide cannon fodder for imperial interests

Canadian soldiers in the trenches at Vimy Ridge, 1917.

On April 2, 1917, the Canadian Corps, deployed as part of the British Army on Vimy Ridge in France in the First World War, initiated the largest artillery barrage in history up to that point. They shelled the German trenches for a week, using more than one million shells. The German artillery pieces were hidden behind the ridge, but by observing the sound and light from their firing, the Canadians were able to locate and destroy about 83 per cent of the German guns.

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Call for removal of militarist mural at Belfast football grounds

Irish resist attempt of paramilitary gang to use sport to recruit youth

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Disturbing new hoarding featuring masked UVF gunmen has appeared next to the home ground of Crusaders Football Club. The mural, bearing the logos of the UVF and the paramilitary group’s “youth wing”, the YCV, appeared at the Irish League ground last month.

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English ‘civilization’ and Braveheart

National Wallace Monument and Ochil Hills in autumn | Ray Mann, Wikipedia

710 years ago on August 23, 1305, the English overlords executed the great Scottish patriot, William Wallace (Uilleam Uallas).

Although vastly outnumbered, especially in cavalry, Wallace and Andrew Moray’s Scottish army had historically defeated a much larger English army at the Battle of Stirling Bridge on September 11, 1297.

After the victory, Wallace styled himself as “Commander of the Army of the Kingdom of Scotland” and the Guardian of the Kingdom of Scotland. Although he utilized the term kingdom instead of nation, Wallace was not simply protecting a throne for an absentee ruler, he was protecting the independence of Scotland. As historian J.M. Reid observes, “Wallace [was] the champion of a rising of a people in its own defence.” [1]

After eight more years of skirmishing and battling with the English forces, on August 5, 1305, Wallace was betrayed and captured near Glasgow. He was handed over to King Edward I of England, who charged him with high treason. Wallace’s reply to the charge was, “I could not be a traitor to Edward, for I was never his subject.”

In a ceremony fit for barbarians, Wallace was dragged naked through the streets of London, then hanged, drawn, and quartered, and his body parts sent to various parts of the kingdom as a warning to other “rebels.”

In 1869 the National Wallace Monument was erected, very close to the site of his army’s glorious victory at Stirling Bridge.

Note

1.W. Croft Dickinson, Scotland from the Earliest Times to 1603, 3rd ed., Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1977, 155-59; J.M. Reid, Scotland’s Progress: The Survival of a Nation, London: Eyre & Spottiswoode, 1971, 64.)

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August 15, 1947: 75th Anniversary of the Independence of India

Farmers mark Indian Independence Day with tractor rallies and protests. Photo above of arrival at the Singhu border in Delh

August 15 is the 75th anniversary of the Independence of India which the ruling class is celebrating with pomp and ceremony, but not in the spirit of the people.

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June 24 – Celebration of Quebec’s National Day

The celebration of Quebec National Day includes the celebration of our 19th century patriots who fought to establish an independent homeland and republic which vests sovereignty in the people. – Youth for Democratic Renewal

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Against the genocidal British partition of 1947: At the farmers’ encampments in India

June 5, 2021. Farmers marching in Amritsar, Punjab.

(June 10) – On June 3, farmers at the encampments surrounding Delhi marked the 74th anniversary of the proclamation of the partition of India by the British. On June 3, 1947, the last British Viceroy of India, Lord Mountbatten, declared that India would be partitioned into two dominions. Muhammad Ali Jinnah, leader of the All-India Muslim League, spoke after him and accepted the partition of India and creation of the Dominion of Pakistan. Then came Jawaharlal Nehru whose acceptance of partition made him the first Prime Minister of India. So too, Baldev Singh claimed to represent the Punjabi Sikh community in the processes of negotiations that resulted in the Partition of India in 1947, for which he became the first Minister of Defence of India. The Congress laid claim to secularism but nonetheless demanded that Punjab and Bengal also be divided on the basis of religion. Leaders of the Communist Party of India had already accepted partition and all the parties conspired with the British against the peoples of India. June 2 marks the date when Mountbatten presented the plans for the partition of India to all these people and they accepted it. Mahatma Gandhi, who had been saying, “partition over my dead body,” told Mountbatten that he had vowed to maintain silence and would not oppose it.

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The Illegitimate State of Israel (I): Zionist Terrorism and Crimes in Palestine – 1939-1945

First in a series published on the occasion of the 73rd anniversary of Al Nabka, May 15, 2021

Complied and edited with an introduction by Tony Seed based on the Encyclopedia of the Palestine Problem authored by the late Issa Nakhleh

Part Two – The Illegitimate State of Israel (II): Zionist Terrorism and Crimes in Palestine – 1946 (forthcoming)

Part Three – The Illegitimate State of Israel (III): Zionist Terrorism and Crimes in Palestine – 1947 (forthcoming)

Part Four – The Illegitimate State of Israel (IV): Zionist Terrorism and Crimes in Palestine – 1948 (forthcoming)

Part Five – The Conspiracy to Expel and the Expulsion of Palestinian Arabs – 1948-1950 (forthcoming)

Introduction

(Updated May 23) – On May 14, 1948, the Zionist state of Israel was established by unilateral declaration in defiance of the United Nations and international law on the basis of 33 massacres, terrorism and the dispossession and mass expulsion of the indigenous Palestinian people from their land by the foreign-armed Zionist state and its militias with the backing of the great powers, the United States in the first place, as well as Canada. Some 750,000 Palestinians were forced to flee. Palestinians were forced from their lands and homes due to military attacks by Zionist forces, supported by the British and U.S. governments. The Israeli Zionist forces attacked 774 cities and villages, and occupied 80 per cent of the Palestinian soil after killing nearly 15,000 Muslim and Christian civilians.

Of this population, approximately one-third were forced to migrate to the West Bank, another third to the Gaza Strip, and the remainder to neighbouring countries such as Jordan, Syria, Lebanon, registered as refugees with the United Nations and forcibly denied the right of return.

Another 350,000 were dispossessed in 1967 following the Six-Day War during which Israel occupied the Gaza Strip, West Bank, Sinai Peninsula and Golan Heights. The number of Palestinians in the Diaspora now numbers over 5 million people. “We must do everything to ensure they [the Palestinians] never do return … The old will die and the young will forget,” said David Ben-Gurion, the founder of Israel, in 1949. But the young have not forgotten.

For the information of readers, we are serializing in five instalments chapters from the Encyclopedia of the Palestine Problem (1999), a 1,000-page work in two volumes by the late Issa Nakhleh*, a distinguished lawyer and statesman, which provide detailed information on the years 1939-1948, as to the nature and methods of the illegitimate Zionist conquest of Palestine of May 15, 1948. These are not otherwise available on the Internet. Much of the information is derived directly from British Colonial files in London. To proceed directly to this exhaustive work, scroll down the page. Continue reading

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Bobby Sands

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Bobby Sands died on 5 May, 1981, 40 years ago this week. This article recounts how he became inspired to join the Irish republican struggle and to lead the 1981 hunger strike against the criminalisation of political prisoners. Continue reading

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105th Anniversary of the Irish Rebellion, 1916: We Only Want the Earth

– Poem by James Connolly, 1907 –

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105th anniversary of the Irish Rebellion, 1916

Glorious uprising of the Irish people | Dougal MacDonald

Mural, Falls Road, Ireland, celebrating the 100th anniversary of the Easter Rising in 2016

The Easter Rising (Éirí Amach na Cásca), also known as the Easter Rebellion, was an armed uprising in Ireland during Easter Week in 1916, from April 24-29. The Rising was part of the centuries-long ongoing struggle of the Irish people for independence from England, which began in 1169 with Henry II’s annexation of Ireland. The Rising was no isolated incident or “putsch” as some labeled it at the time to denigrate it. The Irish people have always resisted British rule without letup. Prior to the Rising, at least 20 other separate rebellions had taken place since the 16th century, including within Canada. The single-minded aim of the Irish people has always been to fight to win their independence by ending British colonial rule so as to be free to decide their own destiny. Today they are fighting to reunify Ireland. “A United Ireland Is an Idea Whose Time Has Come,” the leader of Sinn Féin, Mary Lou McDonald said in 2021. Continue reading

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