Tag Archives: British colonialism

We should never forget Bobby Sands, nor the brutality of the Thatcher government in Ireland

Today marks the 39th anniversary of the death of Bobby Sands ((Irish: Roibeárd Gearóid Ó Seachnasaigh; 9 March 1954 – 5 May 1981) ) inside the H-blocks of Long Kesh internment camp. On 5 May 1981, Sands laid down his life for his and his comrades’ right for recognition as political prisoners. Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under Europe, History

Looking towards a New Ireland: “The Republic is within our sight’

The Irish general election of February 8 concluded with no party holding a majority of seats in Dáil Éireann. Sinn Féin made significant gains; it received the most first-preference votes, and won 37 of the 160 seats, the party’s best result since it took its current form in 1970. Fianna Fáil also won 37 seats, but with fewer first-preference votes. Fine Gael, the governing party led by Leo Varadkar, came third both in seats (35) and in first-preference votes. Of the 51 remaining seats, one is held by the Irish Speaker, uncontested, 19 were won by independent candidates, and 31 by other parties: Green Party, Labour Party, Social Democrats, Solidarity-People Before Profit, Aontú, and Independents4Change. Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under Europe

Canada’s relations with Caricom: Self-serving definition of what it means to be a ‘vital partner’

Heads of Government reaffirm solidarity with Cuba at the 31st CARICOM Inter-Sessional Summit held from February 18 -19 in St Michael, Barbados.

(February 23) – The meeting of the regime change Lima Group hosted by Canada on February 20 in Ottawa comes right on the heels of Foreign Minister François-Philippe Champagne’s meeting on February 18-19 with leaders of Caribbean Community (CARICOM) in Bridgetown, Barbados. He was sent as a substitute for Prime Minister Justin Trudeau.

The 15-member organization[1] has served as an effective block to attempts by the U.S. and its allies to use the discredited Organization of American States (OAS) as a political weapon against Venezuela. It has  denied them the number of votes needed to take action against Venezuela in the name of the OAS. This led the U.S. and Canada to set up the illegitimate Lima Group outside the OAS for the purpose of advancing their illegal regime change project. Continue reading

1 Comment

Filed under Canada

This day in 1945: On Holocaust Memorial Day

Red Army doctor attends to Auschwitz prisoner after its liberation In January, 1945

Red Army doctor attends to Auschwitz prisoner after its liberation on January 27, 1945

In this seminal essay originally published on this website in 2009, Dr Hakim Adi challenges the false narrative around Holocaust Memorial Day. January 27, the day of the liberation of Auschwitz by the Red Army in 1945, is commemorated as Holocaust Memorial Day internationally.

Continue reading

1 Comment

Filed under Europe, History

The Englishman who invented the concentration camp

Demonstrations have broken out on Canada to condemn U.S. racist concentration camps. It was in Canada in 1916 that the city of Berlin, Ontario was renamed Kitchener at the height of racist attacks on residents of German origin and Mennonite faith during the height of the first imperialist world war, a consequence of “top down” “war=driven propaganda.” But who was this Kitchener?

The Irish-born inventor of the concentration camp, Horatio Herbert Kitchener.

By NIALL O’DOWD, Irsihcentral

There has been heated discussion on the term “concentration camp” since allegations by Democrats that such camps are soon going to start operating with migrant children in southern U.S. border areas. Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under Africa, History

This Day. Quotes by Bobby Sands

bobbysandsdrawing.jpgToday is the 48th anniversary of the death of the heroic Irish patriot Bobby Sands (Irish: Roibeárd Gearóid Ó Seachnasaigh; 9 March 1954 – 5 May 1981) after 66 days on hunger strike at Long Kesh prison. We remember Bobby and his comrades and the blanket men and the women in Armagh. In his solemn memory, we publish a brief collection of quotes, some famous, some less well known. 

Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under Europe, History

Australia Day

Australia Day on January 26 marks the anniversary of the 1788 arrival of the “First Fleet” to Sydney Cove, carrying mainly convicts and troops from Britain. For many indigenous Australians, who trace their lineage on the continent back 60,000 years, it is “Invasion Day”, the start of Britain’s colonization of aboriginal lands and their brutal subjugation – akin to “Columbus Day” that is celebrated in the USA.

The ruling elite that emerged in Australia made a determination of all those considered acceptable to constitute a nation of themselves based on ethnic, religious, political, physical and intellectual criteria. All outside the criteria were excluded and even exterminated. In fact, this approach became the policy of Nazi Germany. Today this approach requires that all those who do not swear allegiance to the “values” declared Australian, American, Canadian, British, civilized, etc., are qualified for civil death.

Due to colonialism, Australia’s 700,000 or so indigenous people track near the bottom of its 25 million citizens in almost every economic and social indicator. While opinion polls suggest over half the country supports changing Australia Day, the conservative government is still trying to legally entrench it as a national holiday.

Australia’s day for secrets, flags and cowards by John Pilger

Leave a comment

Filed under History, No Harbour for War (Halifax)