Tag Archives: Iceland

Research notes: The militarized Atlantic – From Norfolk and Halifax to the Irish and Baltic seas

Work in progress by Tony Seed

A report conducted by the Marine Accident Investigation Branch (MAIB) – published in July – found that the two vessels came within 50-100 metres of each other during the horrific incident on November 6, 2018. The investigation revealed that it was the third time in four years that a submerged Royal Navy submarine had narrowly missed a calamitous collision with another vessel. Continue reading

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Filed under Canada, Canadian Forces, Caribbean, Central America, Europe, South America, United States

Warship Watch: US Navy reactivates Second Fleet to control the North Atlantic

Protest against warships in Halifax harbour and expansion of the Canadian navy, CFB Stadacona, May 29, 2012.

By TONY SEED

The U.S. Navy is reestablishing its Second Fleet to control the North Atlantic, navy sources report.[1] It will be operational by July 1 and headquartered in Norfolk, Virginia. Continue reading

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History: When Iceland’s women went on strike

Thousands of striking women gather in Reykjavik, Iceland in 1975.

Thousands of striking women gather in Reykjavik, Iceland in 1975.

On October 24, 1975, Iceland’s women went on strike, refusing to do any work – outside or inside the home – taking “the day off” from paid labour, housework, and child care. An estimated 90 per cent of Icelandic women participated & 25,000 – a tenth of the population – gathered at a rally in Reykjavik. Held during the period of Icelandic resistance against British plunder of its cod stocks (the Cod Wars), it was the largest demonstration in the nation’s history since the 1949 popular opposition to Iceland’s membership in NATO and the presence of U.S. military bases, and shut down the entire country. Airports were closed, schools were closed, and hospitals couldn’t function. An article the day after said, “The militant women…staged their token stoppage to show just how indispensable they are. And the men, who treated all the strike threats as a huge joke, began to get the point.” The day was later remembered as “the long Friday.” The following year, Iceland’s Parliament (now half women) passed a law guaranteeing women equal pay and paid maternity leave. Four years later, Iceland elected the world’s first female President. And today, Iceland has the highest gender equality in the world.

From Women’s History Archives: Women’s Strike in Reykjavik, Iceland, 1975.

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US-NATO bloc controls Iceland’s air space

From the day of the Anti-NATO protests in Reykjavík. Police unleash tear gas against the people. On the west side of the House of the Althing. March 30th 1949 | Arnaldur Grétarsson & family, rights-holder to these photographs.

From the day of the Anti-NATO protests in Reykjavík. Police unleash tear gas against the people. On the west side of the House of the Althing. March 30th 1949 | Arnaldur Grétarsson & family, rights-holder to these photographs.

On May 10, 1940 Britain invaded neutral and sovereign Iceland, then in a union with Denmark which had been brutally invaded by Hitlerite Germany. The British occupation force of 25,000 troops was bolstered by troops from Canada, which in turn occupied Greenland, a source of minerals for the U.S.-owned Inco nickel monopoly. Iceland subsequently agreed in July 1941 to a tripartite treaty under which U.S. Marines – reaching as many as 50,000 – deployed to relieve the British garrison in Iceland on the condition that all military forces be withdrawn from Iceland immediately upon the conclusion of the war in Europe. The contribution of the Icelandic people, especially its fishermen, to the anti-fascist struggle, was second to none. On VE Day, thousands of U.S. soldiers and sailors went berserk in Reykjavík until pacified by Icelandic police and civilians. And, in fact, U.S. forces stayed until 2006 – at the military base Naval Station Keflavik. Continue reading

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Arctic: Pentagon deepens military links with NATO bloc

By Donna Miles, American Forces Press Service, U.S. Department of Defense

WASHINGTON  (Nov. 14) – WHEN travel brochures feature Arctic expeditions, adventure-seekers think of a once-unreachable fantasyland rich with wildlife and a pristine frozen tundra stretching as far as the eye can see.

Coast Guard Capt. Ed Westfall, chief of U.S. European Command’s Arctic strategy branch, thinks more of the second- and third-order effects of the melting polar icecap, in terms of not just tourism, but also its effect on maritime traffic, fishing and oil and gas exploration. Continue reading

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Filed under Americas, Canada, United States

NATO’s, Pentagon’s new strategic battleground: The Arctic

In this Aug. 24, 2009 picture provided by the US Coast Guard, the US Coast Guard Cutter Healy breaks ice ahead of the Canadian Coast Guard Ship Louis S. St-Laurent in the Arctic Ocean. The two ships are taking part in a multi-year, multi-agency Arctic survey to define the Arctic continental shelf.

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Filed under No Harbour for War (Halifax)