Tag Archives: Japan – Hiroshima

This day. Anniversary of Dresden fire bombing – Allied war crime prelude to the Cold War

Dresden had little or nothing to do with the war against the Nazis. But it had much, if not everything, to do with a new conflict in which the Nazis and the Japanese imperialists would be Anglo-American allies and the enemy would be the Soviet Union | DOUGAL MACDONALD

(FILES) Photo dated 25 February 1945 sho

Aftermath of the 1945 bombing of Dresden, Germany by Allied forces – at the Old Market, following bombings on 13 February 1945 | WALTER HAHN/AFP/Getty Images

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76th anniversary of the use of nuclear weapons in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, August 6 and 9, 1945

Never Again! All Out to Make Canada a Zone for Peace!

On the very sad anniversaries of the U.S. nuclear attacks against the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, on August 6 and 9, 1945 respectively, the Communist Party of Canada (Marxist-Leninist) expresses its deepest respects to the survivors of Hiroshima and Nagasaki and their families.

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Hiroshima and Halifax

Painting of the Halifax Explosion

By Tony Seed

The 75th Anniversary of the dropping of an atomic bomb on Hiroshima on the Sixth of August 1945 is a historic universal event with profound immediate significance to present international relations, the danger of war and even nuclear war. For Haligonians, the nuclear devastation of Hiroshima and Nagasaki has a special meaning ,which is even more poignant in the wake of the hugely destructive explosion in  Beirut, Lebanon on August 4. Continue reading

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From Sahtú (Great Bear Lake) to Hiroshima and Nagasaki: Canada and the atom bomb

It is fortunate that the use of the bomb should have been upon the Japanese rather than upon the white races of Europe.
– William Lyon Mackenzie King, Prime Minister of Canada (August 6, 1945, uncensored diaries)

On July 28, 1931 the first shipment of uranium was loaded onto a small craft at LaBine Point, on the eastern shore of Sahtú (Great Bear Lake, McTavish Arm), NWT | Public Archives of Canada C-23960

By KIM PETERSEN*

Few Canadians know of Canada’s link to Little Boy, the so-christened uranium bomb that exploded over Hiroshima, and Fat Man, the plutonium bomb that devastated Nagasaki. Not only were Japanese citizens expendable in the nuclear holocaust, but the “Canadian Genocide Machine” [1] wreaked long-lasting damage on the Original Peoples in the Arctic. Continue reading

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75th anniversary of the use of nuclear weapons in Hiroshima and Nagasaki

Never Again! All Out to Make Canada a Zone for Peace

75 Years: Canada, Nuclear Weapons and the UN Ban Treaty

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

On the very sad anniversaries of the U.S. nuclear attacks against the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, on August 6 and 9, 1945 respectively, the Communist Party of Canada (Marxist-Leninist) expresses its deepest respects to the survivors of Hiroshima and Nagasaki and their families. Continue reading

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Webinar – 75 Years: Canada, nuclear weapons and the UN ban treaty

Demonstration on Sparks Street in Ottawa, circa 1963, opposes the Pearson Liberal government’s agreement to allow U.S. nuclear missiles on Canadian soil.

Thursday, August 6 — 7:00-8:30 pm EDT
Organized by Hiroshima Nagasaki Day Coalition
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To register click here.

The Hiroshima Nagasaki Day Coalition invites those interested to participate in the 75th Anniversary Commemoration of the atomic bombings. The commemoration will focus on 75 years of living with the threat of nuclear war, and the wisdom gained from its survivors. The main speaker will be Setsuko Thurlow who inaugurated the annual commemorations in Toronto in 1975.

Setsuko Thurlow has been engaged throughout her life in public education and advocacy for nuclear disarmament. She jointly accepted the Nobel Peace Prize on behalf of the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons in 2017.

Peace activist and historian Phyllis Creighton, will sketch Canada’s role in creating the atomic bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, its nuclear industry’s reckless endangering of Dene workers, severely impacting the Indigenous community, Canada’s continued sale of uranium and nuclear reactors enabling more countries to become nuclear armed, and its full commitment to NORAD and NATO, both nuclear alliances relying on nuclear weapons.

Music by Grammy-nominated flautist Ron Korb and photos, animation and brief excerpts from documentaries will show major highlights in the 75-year long effort to abolish nuclear weapons.

Painting by Hideo Kimura who at twelve survived the nuclear bomb dropped on Hiroshima.
The painting was shown as part of an exhibition of art by survivors of the bombings held in Toronto in 2019. It is from the Hiroshima Memorial Peace Museum’s collection.

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74th anniversary of nuclear bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki

No More Hiroshimas! No More Nagasakis!

Today marks the 74th anniversary of the dropping of atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. On the morning of August 6, 1945, the United States dropped an atom bomb that exploded above the Japanese city of Hiroshima killing about 140,000 people in the initial blast, in total more than 237,000. Three days after the Hiroshima bombing, the United States dropped another atomic bomb on the southern Japanese city of Nagasaki killing 8,500 people and eventually resulting in the deaths of more than 70,000 people due to exposure to radiation and injuries. Continue reading

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72nd anniversary of nuclear bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki: No More Hiroshimas! No More Nagasakis!

Today marks the 72nd anniversary of the dropping of atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. On the morning of August 6, 1945, the United States dropped an atom bomb that exploded above the Japanese city of Hiroshima killing about 140,000 people in the initial blast, in total more than 237,000. Three days after the Hiroshima bombing, the United States dropped another atomic bomb on the southern Japanese city of Nagasaki killing 8,500 people and eventually resulting in the deaths of more than 70,000 people due to exposure to radiation and injuries. Continue reading

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Facts about US aims at Hiroshima and Nagasaki

Protest against Japanese Prime Minister Abe’s new security laws at the Peace monument in Hiroshima August 6, 2015.

One of the controversies about how the atrocities at Hiroshima and Nagasaki are remembered concerns the U.S. aims in dropping the bombs. History as written by the victors declared that this act was necessary to force the surrender of militarist Japan and bring an end to the war. The death and destruction was a tragedy but the Japanese people themselves bore responsibility for their own suffering, so the story goes. To this day the U.S. refuses to apologize for these war crimes and on a visit to Hiroshima on May 27 U.S. President Obama did not even acknowledge that the U.S. perpetrated the crimes or why, merely stating that “death came from the sky.” Continue reading

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‘Little Boy’ – a macabre irony

Panoramic view of the monument marking the hypocenter, or ground zero, of the atomic bomb explosion over Nagasaki | Dean S Pemberton, Wikipedia

Panoramic view of the monument marking the hypocenter, or ground zero, of the atomic bomb explosion over Nagasaki | Dean S Pemberton, Wikipedia

By LILI CHI*

Tom Ferebee opened the hatches that protected Little Boy. At 8:14 a.m., the Enola Gay gained in altitude and began the 158° turn. At 8:15 a.m, Ferebee activated the hatches. He dropped the “atomic baby.” The rotation put space between the apparatus and the blast. The 20,000-kiloton, 4-ton, 3-metre long bomb blew up at 600 metres in the air, levelling 75 square kilometres of downtown Hiroshima with its heat and the shock waves. The flash gave way to a gigantic mushroom cloud of smoke and fire that rose many kilometres in height. Some 200,000 Japanese people died, melted, in less than 5 minutes. It was the morning of August 6, 1945.

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A historic countdown to the US nuclear attack on Hiroshima and Nagasaki

Nagasaki%22erased%22To this day the United States claims that its actions on the morning of August 6, 1945, when it dropped an atom bomb on Hiroshima and on August 9 when it dropped a bomb on Nagasaki, were righteous, moral and proper. The following is a compilation of articles that create a historical countdown from Pressing Issues which looks at the behind the scene events of the days leading to the US nuclear attacks on the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, respectively on August 6 and August 9, 1945. These unprecedented war crimes had nothing to do with the fight against Japanese militarism, which was suffering defeats everywhere and whose surrender was imminent. Examining the nuclear attacks on Japan, it is worth quoting General Eisenhower that ”the Japanese were ready to surrender and it wasn’t necessary to hit them with that awful thing.”This mass murder of civilian populations at Hiroshima and Nagasaki was instead meant as a threat to the peoples of the world, especially the Soviet Union, showing the depths of depravity and criminality to which the U.S. was willing to sink to establish its domination.GREG MITCHELL* provides a day-to-day chronology. Continue reading

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No more Hiroshimas! No more Nagasakis! Canada needs an anti-war government! All out to make Canada a zone for peace

On the occasion of the 71st anniversary of the first use of a nuclear weapon against human beings, the Communist Party of Canada (Marxist-Leninist) calls on Canadians to go all out to make Canada a zone for peace that stands against all U.S. imperialist war preparations and gets Canada out of NATO and NORAD.

CPC(M-L) calls on Canadians to be on alert to the manoeuvres of the U.S. ruling elite to unite its warring factions behind a Hillary Clinton war president with their own program to “make America great again.” The biggest efforts of the U.S. establishment and its allies at this time are to block the resistance movements of the people, especially their political mobilization for democratic rights and against war and aggression, in particular against U.S. preparations for a third world war. On the anniversaries of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, CPC(M-L) emphasizes the internationalist duty of Canadians to ensure Canada is not a factor for war as well as to directly oppose the election of a war president and the acceleration of war preparations in the U.S. Continue reading

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Why did Japan surrender?

General Douglas MacArthur, as Supreme Commander of the Allied Forces, accepted the unconditional surrender document signed by the Japanese.

US General Douglas MacArthur, as Supreme Commander of the Allied Forces, accepts the unconditional surrender document signed by the Japanese | Keystone/Getty Images

Sixty-six years ago, the US dropped a nuclear bomb on Hiroshima. Now, some American historians admit that’s not what ended World War II in Asia | GARETH COOK, Boston Globe

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