Tag Archives: Namibia. Angola

When Africa called, Fidel and Cuba answered

Fidel and Cuba provided an example of the possibility of building relations based on genuine solidarity and social love. ISAAC SANEY*

cuban-soldiers-cuito-cuanavale

“The Cuban people hold a special place in the hearts of the peoples of Africa. The Cuban internationalists have made a contribution to African independence, freedom and justice, unparalleled for its principled and selfless character … Cubans came to our region as doctors, teachers, soldiers, agricultural experts, but never as colonizers. They have shared the same trenches with us in the struggle against colonialism, underdevelopment, and apartheid.” – Nelson Mandela

Cuban revolutionary leader Fidel Castro instilled in the Cuban people the internationalist spirit Mandela spoke about. The country’s dedication to the liberation of Africa is unique in its scope and success. Continue reading

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Legacies: Lives lived / past progressive – Cuba’s Jorge Risquet: the brother I never had

a-Cuban-Jorge-Risquet-with-Mandela

Jorge Risquet with Nelson Mandela.

Jorge Risquet was like the brother I never had . We had been working together since 1994. He had been selected by Fidel and Raúl Castro to oversee my access to the closed Cuban archives, and he headed the declassification commission that was created for my research on Cuban policy in Africa.  Continue reading

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Kissinger and Ford considered attack on Cuba to defend apartheid South Africa

Cuba’s direct, critical and extensive role in the struggle against the apartheid regime in South Africa is little known in the West. November 5th marks the 39th anniversary of Cuba’s decision to deploy combat-troops, at the request of the Angolan government, to repulse a major South African invasion of October 1975. Now a new book confirms previously secret plans to defend racist and fascist South Africa by “clobbering” the island Republic of Cuba itself. “I think we are going to have to smash Castro,” Kissinger told President Ford. 

The first page of the memorandum of conversation of the historic July 9, 1975, U.S.-Cuba meeting at the Pierre Hotel (see Document 9). (Click to enlarge)

The first page of the memorandum of conversation of the historic July 9, 1975, U.S.-Cuba meeting at the Pierre Hotel (see Document 9). (Click to enlarge)

(Oct. 1) – U.S. Secretary of State Henry Kissinger ordered a series of secret contingency plans that included airstrikes and mining of Cuban harbors in the aftermath of Fidel Castro’s decision to send Cuban forces into Angola in late 1975, according to declassified documents made public today for the first time. “If we decide to use military power it must succeed. There should be no halfway measures,” Kissinger instructed General George Brown of the Joint Chiefs of Staff during a high-level meeting of national security officials on March 24, 1976, that included then Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld. “I think we are going to have to smash Castro,” Kissinger told President Ford. “We probably can’t do it before the [1976 presidential] elections.”

“I agree,” the president responded. Continue reading

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Mandela is dead: Why hide the truth about apartheid?

A refelection by FIDEL CASTRO

Nelson Mandela and Fidel Castro

(December 12, 2013) – Maybe the empire thought that we would not honor our word when, during days of uncertainty in the past century, we affirmed that even if the USSR were to disappear Cuba would continue struggling. World War II broke out on September 1, 1939 when Nazi-fascist troops invaded Poland and struck like a lightning over the heroic people of the USSR, who contributed 27 million lives to preserve mankind from that brutal massacre that ended the lives of 50 million persons. Continue reading

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Mandela: Madiba is gone – The struggle continues

Nelson Mandela addresses a jubilant mass rally of 100,000 people in Soweto, February 13, 1990,  two days after his release from 27 years of political imprisonment by the racist apartheid regime of South Africa, his freedom the result of sustained political action and armed struggle in South Africa.

Nelson Mandela addresses a jubilant mass rally of 100,000 people in Soweto, February 13, 1990, two days after his release from 27 years of political imprisonment by the racist apartheid regime of South Africa, his freedom the result of sustained political action and armed struggle in South Africa.

By ISAAC SANEY

Historic march by 20,000 women in Pretoria against the racist pass laws, August 9, 1956, today commemorated as Women's Day in South Africa. The women chanted the phrase “wathinth’ abafazi, wathinth’ imbokodo” which translates as “you strike a woman, you strike a rock.”

Historic march by 20,000 women in Pretoria against the racist pass laws, August 9, 1956, today commemorated as Women’s Day in South Africa. The women chanted the phrase “wathinth’ abafazi, wathinth’ imbokodo” which translates as “you strike a woman, you strike a rock.”

TML (Dec. 7) – ON THURSDAY EVENING DECEMBER 5, Nelson Mandela died at his home in Johannesburg, South Africa. The life of the man known to the anti-apartheid movement as Madiba spanned almost the entire existence of the African National Congress (ANC). The ANC was founded under British colonial rule in January 1912 and it was within it that Madiba would play many leadership roles. The ANC provided the umbrella under which all those opposed to white minority rule, from revolutionary communists to trade union activists to dispossessed township youth, came together and worked out a program of struggle aimed at achieving black majority rule. Continue reading

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