Tag Archives: Norman Solomon

The other side of the Washingon Post’s Katharine Graham

The Post’s Watergate team, including from left to right, publisher Katharine Graham, Carl Bernstein, Bob Woodward, Howard Simons, and editor Ben Bradlee.

Hollywood loves to make heroes of The Washington Post, whose sole owner is a CIA contractor, for the rare moments when it has seemingly stood up for journalism – while forgetting the blood-soaked cases of the Post spreading lies to justify wars, writes NORMON SOLOMON*. To this day it continues to violate universal journalistic protocol by refusing to disclose its $600 million conflict of interest when reporting on the US intelligence community. Its recent efforts include publishing a predictably fact-challenged op-ed arguing that the US Congress must reauthorize the surveillance program known as Section 702 of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act, which is deliberately used to collect communications of US citizens. – TS

(Dec. 20) – Movie critics are already hailing “The Post,” directed by Steven Spielberg and starring Meryl Streep as Washington Post publisher Katharine Graham. Millions of people will see the film in early winter. But the real-life political story of Graham and her newspaper is not a narrative that’s headed to the multiplexes.

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James Risen’s book, Pay Any Price

Barrack Obama promised a “transparent” administration – but Americans did not know the transparency was a one-way street, letting the government look at the people, and concentrating executive power in the White House and a warmongering “commander-in-chief” as president; meanwhile, using coercive measures and disinformation to block the public’s ability to view issues objectively and work out solutions, a reality described in James Risen’s new book, reviewed by NORMAN SOLOMON.

james-risenNo single review or interview can do justice to Pay Any Price – the new book by James Risen that is the antithesis of what routinely passes for journalism about the “war on terror.” Instead of evasive tunnel vision, the book offers big-picture acuity: focusing on realities that are pervasive and vastly destructive. Continue reading

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