Tag Archives: Oil Spills

Lessons from the bunker fuel spill in Vancouver’s harbour

King Stephen – “Canada For Sale” by Royal Prerogative | Tim O’Brien, The Muse

King Stephen – “Canada For Sale” by Royal Prerogative. Photo is from a June 25, 2011 rally of some 3,000 Newfoundlanders on the St. John’s waterfront against the decision of the Harper government to close the Marine Rescue Centre. | Tim O’Brien, The Muse

Sometime in the afternoon of April 8, bunker fuel started leaking from a ship anchored in English Bay in the outer harbour of the Port of Vancouver as it waited to load its cargo of grain at the docks. At 5:10 pm, a recreational boater noticed a large oil slick and called 911. The call was passed on to the Canadian Coast Guard, the designated lead agency for incidents like this. A Port Metro Vancouver boat appeared on the scene around 6:00 pm. Continue reading

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REFLECTIONS ON THE PRESTIGE OIL DISASTER: (Part 3) ‘Don’t make me fish off Cape St. Mary’s’

The tourism ads hype Newfoundland as “the Far East of the Western world,” but its waters are the waste-oil dumps of the Northwest Atlantic

By TONY SEED and GARY ZATZMAN

Part Three of a four-part series. Part One is here, Part Two is here, and Part Four is yet to be published.

HALIFAX  (March 25, 2004) – THERE ARE 365 islands in Newfoundland’s Placentia Bay. Fog reduces visibility to less than a kilometre an average 187 days a year. Hundreds of oil tankers – almost 300 in the year 2000 alone – enter that body of water and its prime fishing grounds, along with dozens of small fishing boats manned by crews who come from families that have fished the bay for centuries. The amount of shipping will be intensified with construction of the new Inco hydrometallurgical demonstration plant in Argentia in Placentia Bay to process concentrate from Voisey’s Bay, Labrador. It is scheduled to open in 2006. Continue reading

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REFLECTIONS ON THE PRESTIGE OIL DISASTER: (Part 2) The marine environment and sovereignty – lessons for Canada

By TONY SEED and GARY ZATZMAN

Part Two of a four-part series. Part One is here, Part Three is here, and Part Four is yet to be published.

HALIFAX (16 March 2004) – JACQUES COUSTEAU once observed that oil spills such as that of the Prestige off the coast of Spain are like smoking – the problem is the cumulative effect over time. Canada is already addicted. The cancer has been caused not by cigarettes but by American oil monopolies, their international shipping clients and a neo-colonial state. And it is metastatisizing. Continue reading

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REFLECTIONS ON ‘EL PRESTIGE’ OIL DISASTER: (Part 1) Two years on, the killer spill continues

News analysis by TONY SEED, Copy edited by GARY ZATZMAN

Part One of a four-part series. Part Two is here, Part Three is here, and Part Four is yet to be published.

Introduction

ON 14 MARCH 2004 the Spanish people voted to bury the Popular Party government of José María Aznar. This brought to an end eight years’ rule by a pro-Franco politician who dragged the Spanish people into the American occupation of Iraq and the massacre of the Iraqi people against their express will.

Aznar’s clique was especially detested in the northwestern Spanish province of Galicia, where the oil tanker Prestige sank in late 2002, spreading massive pollution of marine fauna and beaches, destroying tens of thousands’ of people’s livelihoods in the rich fishery of the region, and where Manuel Fraga Iribarne – the founder of Aznar’s party, Franco’s last police minister and a fascist-era relic – still retains a regional grip on power. Forests are being felled as we speak to provide the paper to print the oceans of commentary concerning the impact of Aznar’s defeat on the future of other European governments that signed on to the Bush administration’s so-called “coalition of the willing” – many of whom, like Aznar’s clique, have coveted access to Iraqi oil. Continue reading

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