Tag Archives: Shunpiking Magazine

The Martin Luther King you don’t see on TV

From our archives. By JEFF COHEN and NORMAN SOLOMON*

MartinLutherKingBeyondVietnam It’s become a TV ritual: Every year in mid-January, around the time of Martin Luther King’s birthday, we get perfunctory network news reports about “the slain civil rights leader.”

The remarkable thing about this annual review of King’s life is that several years – his last years – are totally missing, as if flushed down a memory hole. Continue reading

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From our archives: Dossier on the 60th anniversary of the victory over fascism

6oth Anniversary VE Day VerticalHeader

Shunpiking Magazine’s Online Dossier, May-June 2005

INTRODUCTION

May 8, 2005 marked the 60th anniversary of the surrender of Adolf Hitler’s Third Reich in 1945 and the defeat of Nazi Germany in Europe. Called Victory in Europe Day (V-E Day) in the English-speaking countries, it is celebrated on May 9 in Russia and other countries of the former Soviet Union where it marks the victory of the Great Patriotic War. The defeat of fascism in Europe was a historic event with a permanent significance not only for Europe but for all peoples, who made the greatest contribution to its defeat. Imperialists can be stopped and their weapons silenced.

With this Dossier we want to give our readers a vivid idea of how war may and will creep up on them if it is not opposed. We want to try and discover the real political and economic origins and causes of WWII and its conduct, length and end, the war aims of the different parties, and show how war can be hatched in the greatest secrecy. How was the fate of the peoples of Europe sealed? How was fascism defeated? This has special urgency in our own day, when the imperial Washington of George W. Bush has taken on the task of declaring itself above international law and the Charter of the United Nations. Continue reading

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This day in 1955: Rosa Parks took her seat on the bus

Rosa Parks in Halifax in August 1998 at the annual Africville Reunion in Seaview Park | Paul Adams (Click to enlarge)

Rosa Parks in Halifax in August 1998 at the annual Africville Reunion in Seaview Park | Paul Adams (Click to enlarge)

1955 (1 December): The status of non-persons for African Americans was the target of the modern US civil rights movement. With untold sacrifice it led to more historic successes. The movement was strengthened by the courageous action of one person. Rosa Parks, 42, a black seamstress living in Montgomery, Alabama, refused to sit in the back of a public bus as required by segregationist laws then in effect. “Whites Only” or “Coloreds Only” were the signs marking this separation at the entrance to restaurants, hotels, water fountains, private buildings, schools, etc. The cruel and absurd segregationist law in the long trail of slavery in the American South stated that if a Black person was sitting on a bus and a white person wanted that seat, the former would have to stand and allow the latter to sit.

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This day in 1941: Rumbula massacre, Riga, Latvia

Map.BalticsKillFieldsToday is the dark anniversary of the first of two dates in 1941 (the other is December 8) in which 25,000 Jews were marched to their death by Nazis in the Rumbula Forest near the capital of Latvia, Riga.

The Rumbula massacre was carried out by the Nazi Einsatzgruppe A with the help of local Latvian collaborators of the Arajs Kommando, with support from other such Latvian auxiliaries. The Arajs Kommando, led by SS-Sturmbannführer Viktors Arājs, was a unit of Latvian Auxiliary Police subordinated to the Nazi Sicherheitsdienst. It was one of the more well-known and notorious killing units during the Holocaust.

At Rumbula on 30 November and 8 December 1941, 12 German machine gunners shot about 25,000 Jews, who were marched to their death from the Riga ghetto by Latvian police. The Jews of Latvia, once numbering 86,000, were virtually wiped out. Continue reading

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Scottish independence: ‘Scotland Demands Democracy’ (2002)

We are providing information on the background of the movement for Scottish independence, its background and the issues involved. This article by Tony Seed was published in Mac-talla, the annual Gaelic edition of Shunpiking, Nova Scotia’s discovery magazine, May, 2002, No. 42, and is slightly revised by the author for this publication.

The massive ‘Scotland Demands Democracy’ demonstration at the European Summit held in Edinburgh, December 11 and 12, 1992. Over 25,000 people participated and endorsed the Democracy Declaration of Scotland, read by the actor Sean Connery | Photo courtesy of Alan Miller (Click to enlarge)

The massive ‘Scotland Demands Democracy’ demonstration at the European Summit held in Edinburgh, December 11 and 12, 1992. Over 25,000 people participated and endorsed the Democracy Declaration of Scotland, read by the actor Sean Connery | Photo courtesy of Alan Miller (Click to enlarge)

IN accordance with the September 1997 referendum, Scotland now has home rule. Nearly three hundred years after the abolition of the last Scottish parliament, the country again has its own elected legislative authority. But there is no knowing if this stage will be Scotland’s last.

Debating chamber of the Socttish parliament

Debating chamber of the Socttish parliament

ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON reckoned that Calton Hill was the best place to view Edinburgh, “since you can see the Castle, which you lose from the Castle, and Arthur’s Seat, which you cannot see from Arthur’s Seat.” Here, below the hill in one of the city’s greatest buildings, the Grecian Old Royal High School, it was assumed for many years Scotland’s new Parliament would sit. Less than a year before the first elections, the Scottish Office unexpectedly announced that a new building would be commissioned. Empty docklands were proposed. Ultimately the ideal location chosen was a disused brewery – in Holyrood, at the foot of the Royal Mile, neighbour to the royal palace – a site that satisfied no-one except the land owners and the royals. The parliament, which has been sitting in the Church of Scotland Assembly Hall, will move into this £200 million home soon. Continue reading

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In Memoriam – Reginald Maloney

Photo by Cheryl Maloney

June 6, 1941 – December 3, 2013 | Photo by April Maloney

A Reflection by Tony Seed

On Tuesday, December 3, 2013, Keptin Saqamow Reginald Maloney, 72, left us forever when he passed away in Colchester East Hants Health Centre in Truro, Nova Scotia, surrounded by family and close friends.

A respected Elder, political leader, Chief, proud Mi’kmaq warrior and a friend, Chief Maloney was a leader in the epochal battle of the Mi’kmaq nation in defence of their hereditary rights and to affirm their right-to-be. Continue reading

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In Memoriam: Ritchie Oakley

2012.Ritchie Oakley

February 20, 1945–April 6, 2013

ON APRIL 6, Robert Ritchie Oakley, 68, left us forever when he passed away in Halifax, Nova Scotia. Ritchie was a well-known Maritimes musician, band leader, and a longtime friend and colleague. His life was rich, reflecting the work and persistent struggle for a livelihood of a cultural worker and talented music producer who refused to be moulded by the stamp of the official establishment in the service of U.S. cultural domination; he came to affirm the dignity of Maritimes and Canadian cultural creators and indeed of the working people against the heartlessness and soullessness prevailing in this sphere of society and in turn was victimized by its cultural cabal, mainly through a wall of silence. Nevertheless, Ritchie Oakley’s creative talent and body of work was such that in 1995, the Nova Scotia Country Music Association honoured Ritchie as songwriter of the year and instrumentalist of the year. In 1998 the Music Industry Association of Nova Scotia named him producer of the year. In 2008, the East Coast Music Awards designated him one of the winners of the Stompin’ Tom Awards, tributes bestowed for “unsung heroes” of Atlantic Canadian music. Continue reading

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