Tag Archives: Slave trade

This Day. June 24, 1497 – Britain’s ‘Dominion, Title and Jurisdiction‘ of Canada begins

Indigenous resistance to colonialism continues in the present, including Mi’kmaq defence of their hereditary rights against fracking on their traditional territories.

By Tony Seed

On June 24, 1497, the Venetian navigator Giovanni Caboto (John Cabot), commissioned by Henry VII of England, landed in Newfoundland. Believing it to be an island off the coast of Asia, he named it New Found Land. Under the commission of this king to “conquer, occupy, and possess” the lands of “heathens and infidels,” Caboto reconnoitred the Newfoundland coast and landed on the northern shore of what is today known as Cape Breton Island in Nova Scotia. Continue reading

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Barbados declares itself a republic. Yes! It can be done!

Ceremony swearing in Dame Sandra Mason as Barbados’ first President, November 29, 2021.

For the information of readers, we are reposting two articles on the declaration of Barbados, November 30, 2021 that it will become a republic.

Renewal Update

Today, November 30, Barbados became a Republic. The Republic of Barbados was declared at a ceremony late in the evening on November 29 at the National Heroes Square in the capital, Bridgetown, to coincide with the anniversary of Barbados’ formal independence from Britain, 55 years ago.

With this action, Barbados has become the fourth of Britain’s previous colonies in the Caribbean to become a republic, following Guyana, Trinidad and Tobago and Dominica which have had already taken this path forward.

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Peoples of the Caribbean give ‘working royals’ a fitting reception

The visits in March and April of the so-called working members of the British royal family to Commonwealth “realms” were shocking for their display of racist condescension, extravagant living and wasteful expenditures. | Margaret Villamizar

Protest in Jamaica against the Royal Visit, March 23, 2022.

Organized to mark Queen Elizabeth II’s 70 years on the English throne, these “Platinum Jubilee” tours to the 14 former British colonies that retain the British monarch as their official head of state have taken different members of the “House of Windsor” to six Caribbean countries, Australia and Papua New Guinea. The latest such tour brought “heir to the throne” Charles and his wife Camilla Parker Bowles to Canada from May 17 to 19.

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Royal family’s fortune from the slave trade

From the enslavement and deportation of the Irish to British colonies in Oceania and the West Indies to the kidnapping of Africans, the British Crown made much of their vast personal wealth from the human slave trade. Every monarch and their family from Elizabeth Tudor onwards were financiers and beneficiaries of this trade in human flesh.

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Remembrance, Revelation, and Reparation: The Trans-Atlantic Slave System and Its Afterlife

March 25 Online Presentation

– A presentation by Dr. Isaac Saney, followed by Q&A –

Friday, March 25, 2022 at 3:30-5:30 pm EST

Organized by the University of Windsor to commemorate the UN International Day of the Remembrance of the Victims of Slavery and the Transatlantic Slave Trade, as part of the University of Windsor’s Equity, Diversity, Inclusion and Decolonization (EDID) Week.

The Trans-Atlantic Slave System fundamentally altered not only the lives and destinies of millions of Africans and the African continent but also transformed the world. Its boundaries and reach extended into every dimension, facet and interstice of the new global society. Indeed, living in a world created by and through the sufferings and struggles of enslaved Africans presupposes that the creation of a more just and sustainable political, economic, social, and ecological order necessitates not only reckoning with this history but also demanding reparatory justice.

To register click here.

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Slavery and Reparations: African Nova Scotia, Canada and Beyond

Updated October 27

Dalhousie University and the University of King’s College, together and in partnership with the Black Cultural Centre for Nova Scotia are pleased to announce an online event focused on the theme of Slavery and Reparations: African Nova Scotia, Canada and Beyond. This event is being held in preparation for the 2023 Universities Studying Slavery Conference, which will take place in Halifax, Nova Scotia (see below).

Monday, November 1 – 2-4pm EST & 5-7pm EST

Featuring panelists (2-4pm EST): Cikiah Thomas (Co-ChairInternational Working Committee, Global African Congress); Delvina Bernard (PhD-candidate, International Development Studies, Saint Mary’s University); Dr. Andrea Douglas (Director, Jefferson School African American Heritage Centre)

Keynote lecture (5-7pm EST) by Professor Sir Hilary Beckles, Vice-Chancellor of the University of the West Indies and the leading international scholar on reparations.

Register at http://register.bccns.com

For more information: https://ukings.ca/events/pre-conference-event-for-2023-universities-studying-slavery-conference/

Dalhousie University and the University of King’s College, together and in partnership with the Black Cultural Centre for Nova Scotia are pleased to announce an online event focused on the theme of Slavery and Reparations: African Nova Scotia, Canada and Beyond. This event is being held in preparation for the 2023 Universities Studying Slavery Conference, which will take place in Halifax, Nova Scotia (see below).

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Caricom demands reparation justice after centuries of slavery

Caricom demands reparation justice after centuries of slavery

Georgetown, Aug 23 (Prensa Latina) – The Caribbean Community (Caricom) is today calling for reparation justice for its nations after centuries of slavery and racism perpetrated by several former colonial metropolis.

In the context of the International Day for the Remembrance of the Slave Trade and its Abolition and midway through the International Decade for People of African Descent (2015-2024), Caricom’s member and partner states are advocating through its Reparations Commission (CRC) a reward to the indigenous and afro-descendant communities after the legacy of underdevelopment caused by the colonial period – the native genocide, enslavement and crimes against humanity that hold back the progress of their populations. Continue reading

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Bank of England’s attempt to whitewash its history and present role

According to one historian, the Bank of England should well have been called the Bank of the West Indies, because of its involvement in slavery.

On June 19, in the wake of the global upsurge following the killing of African American George Floyd, and protests in Britain about the glorification of slavery and empire, the Bank of England issued a statement “about its historical links to the slave trade.” Continue reading

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The ‘New Found Land’ and Heroic Resistance of the Mi’kmaq and Beothuk

‘Discovery’ of New Found Land and Cape Breton: Who was Caboto and what was his claim on Canada? Plus:
• Why Canada Was Called a “Dominion”

• Letters Patent Issued to John Cabot and the Royal Prerogative

The Royal Charter to the Hudson’s Bay Company

• The Royal Family


Mi’kmaq resistance carries on to the present. Above, they militantly defend their hereditary rights blocking a fracking operation near Rexton, New Brunswick, October 7, 2013.

By TONY SEED*

The Venetian navigator Giovanni Caboto (John Cabot), commissioned by Henry VII of England, landed in Newfoundland on June 24, 1497. Believing it to be an island off the coast of Asia, he named it New Found Land.[1]

Under the commission of this king to “subdue, occupy, and possesse” the lands of “heathens and infidels,” Caboto reconnoitred the Newfoundland coast and also landed on the northern shore of Cape Breton Island in Nova Scotia.[2]

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Canada’s relations with Caricom: Self-serving definition of what it means to be a ‘vital partner’

Heads of Government reaffirm solidarity with Cuba at the 31st CARICOM Inter-Sessional Summit held from February 18 -19 in St Michael, Barbados.

By TONY SEED (February 23) – The meeting of the regime change Lima Group hosted by Canada on February 20 in Ottawa comes right on the heels of Foreign Minister François-Philippe Champagne’s meeting on February 18-19 with leaders of Caribbean Community (CARICOM) in Bridgetown, Barbados. He was sent as a substitute for Prime Minister Justin Trudeau. The 15-member organization[1] has served as an effective block to attempts by the U.S. and its allies to use the discredited Organization of American States (OAS) as a political weapon against Venezuela. It has  denied them the number of votes needed to take action against Venezuela in the name of the OAS. This led the U.S. and Canada to set up the illegitimate Lima Group outside the OAS for the purpose of advancing their illegal regime change project. Continue reading

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This Day. 400th Anniversary of US slavery

Four hundred years ago, a Portuguese ship named the São João Bautista traveled across the Atlantic Ocean carrying a load of captive Africans from Angola, in southwestern Africa, to the “New World.” Seized by two English pirate ships, the captive Africans ended up in the British colony of Virginia, founded just 12 years earlier, the first permanent English settlement in North America established by the Virginia Company of London in 1671. Only twenty survived the journey. Jamestown, Virginia soon became one of the main areas for the arrival of enslaved Africans. The sale of the 20 Africans to the owners of tobacco fields began the Atlantic slave trade on which the United States was built. Continue reading

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Cuba: There is a lot of gold stained with the blood of slaves

Source:  Cuba Ministry of Foreign Affairs
March 30 2016

Cuba highlights the importance of strengthening the activities of international organizations on issues related to slavery and the transatlantic slave trade Continue reading

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Cuba backs Caribbean nations in demand for slavery compensation

reparationsCARICOM wants reparations from the United Kingdom, France and the Netherlands for slavery

Telesur (April 1) – Cuba pledged its support Friday to the Caribbean Community’s quest to receive an apology and compensation from European powers for the transatlantic slave trade.

The Caribbean Community or CARICOM, which has 15 states as members, wants reparations from the United Kingdom, France and the Netherlands in an initiative it says is based on diplomacy and engagement, without resorting to confrontation.

“We support the just demand for compensation hoisted by the Member States of the Caribbean Community,” said Ana Silvia Rodriguez, Cuban ambassador to the United Nations.

“People from the third world are still feeling the effects of the inhuman exploitation of people in their homelands and these peoples clearly deserve compensation for the horrendous crimes committed against their ancestors,” said the diplomat during address to CARICOM officials.

Reparation

Last October, on an official visit to Jamaica, British Prime Minister Cameron acknowledged the “wounds of slavery run very deep” but avoided speaking on the issue of reparation.

Cameron, the first British prime minister to visit Jamaica for the last 14 years, said the slave trade was one “from which history has drawn the bitterest of lessons.”

“Slavery was and is abhorrent in all its forms. It has no place whatsoever in any civilized society, and Britain is proud to have led the way in its abolition,” but offered no compensation.

In late February the chairman of the CARICOM Sub-Committee on Reparations, Barbados Prime Minister Freundel Stuart sent a letter to the British Foreign Office, on behalf of the 15-member countries, for London to formally acknowledge the region’s demands for payment for the transatlantic slave trade.

CARICOM has reportedly given the British office two years to respond to its call, but warned that it is prepared to bring its complaint to the International Court of Justice in The Netherlands.

RELATED:  UK’s Cameron urged to talk slavery reparations in Jamaica

‘Panama Papers’ conceals original source of Cameron family wealth: slavery


Cuba: There is a lot of gold stained with the blood of slaves

Cuba highlights the importance of strengthening the activities of international organizations on issues related to slavery and the transatlantic slave trade

Intervention by the Permanent Alternative Cuba Representative to the United Nations, HE Ambassador Ana Silvia Rodríguez Abascal, in item 118, “tracking the bicentenary of the abolition of the transatlantic slave trade” Commemorative Meeting on the occasion of the International Day remembrance of victims of Slavery and the Transatlantic Slave Trade. 70 UN General Assembly – March 29, 2016

Mr. President:

My delegation associates itself with the statement made by Antigua and Barbuda on behalf of the Group of Latin America and the Caribbean.

Ana Silvia Rodríguez Abasca

Ana Silvia Rodriguez, Cuban ambassador to the United Nations

Slavery and the transatlantic slave trade are among the most serious crimes against humanity that have not been adequately studied, nor its consequences in today’s society duly recognized.

Tragedy and unspeakable horror was the fate of some 15 to 20 million men, women and children that the trans-Atlantic slave uprooted from their homes and were sent to the Americas as commercial cargo receiving an inhumane, unjust and despicable treatment.

Cuba attaches particular importance and sensitivity to the commemoration of the International Day of Remembrance of Victims of Slavery and the Transatlantic Slave Trade. Cuba supported and cosponsored the Resolution 61/19 of the General Assembly commemorating the 200th anniversary of the abolition of the transatlantic slave trade and appointed the day we commemorate today.

Major players in the different stages of the wars to exercise self-determination

The Ten Year’s War of the Cuban people against Spanish colonialism is considered Cuba’s First War of Independence. Led by Generals Antonio Maceo, Máximo Gómez, and Quintín Banderas, the Mambi rebel army was composed mostly (80 to 92 per cent) of AfroCubans and numbered 40,000 in 1870. It is the largest slave rebellion in the hemisphere after the Haitian revolution.

The Ten Year’s War of the Cuban people against Spanish colonialism is considered Cuba’s First War of Independence. Led by Generals Antonio Maceo (pictured), Máximo Gómez, and Quintín Banderas, the Mambi rebel army was composed mostly (80 to 92 per cent) of AfroCubans and numbered 40,000 in 1870. It is the largest slave rebellion in the hemisphere after the Haitian revolution.

Colonial plantations of Cuba emerged as part of this cruel trade, as about one million 300 thousand Africans were taken by force from their villages and families and sold as slave labor on the island. Freed slaves and their descendants, have been major players in the different stages of the wars that allowed the Cuban people to exercise self-determination.

Cuban identity, therefore, was the result of a process of acculturation occurred with the contribution of various ethnic groups in difficult first colonial, then neo-colonial environments. We are a mixture, in the main, of the Hispanic and African. We also influence Asian and Native American peoples.

The Cuban people are most proud of their African roots, which are present in our character and our cultural manifestations. Cuban culture and nationality emerged and  nourished African heritage. Cuba has also provided the sweat and blood of hundreds of thousands of their children to contribute to the emancipation of Africa, a continent to which all humanity will always be indebted.

There is a lot of gold stained with the blood of slaves

There is a lot of gold stained with the blood of slaves, and much of the wealth generated produce shame and reproach. The fate of peoples of the third world was altered greatly by inhuman exploitation and it is these peoples who clearly deserve compensation for the horrendous crimes committed against their ancestors.

The developed countries and their consumer societies responsible for the accelerated and almost unstoppable destruction of the environment, have been the main beneficiaries of the conquest and colonization, slavery and trafficking trans-atlántica, the ruthless exploitation and extermination of hundreds of millions of children of the peoples of the South. They have also enriched the unjust economic order imposed on humanity and international financial institutions created exclusively by them and for them.

Cuba supports the just demand for compensation hoisted by the Member States of CARICOM. Cuba also claims the special and differential treatment required by developing countries, particularly Africa, in its international economic relations. Cuba rejects selfishness and shameful opulence of a few that serve as guidelines to ongoing globalization.

Cuba supports and co-sponsor the draft resolution

Cuba supports and co-sponsor the draft resolution presented each year under this theme by member countries of CARICOM and the African Group. Cuba recognizes the importance of strengthening the activities of the United Nations and other international organizations such as UNESCO in the field. It is the least the international community can do to repair the crime against humanity committed in the trans-Atlantic African to be enslaved.

Thank you very much.

Source:  Cuba Ministry of Foreign Affairs
March 30 2016
by editor


Cuba defends the Caribbean claim for reparations at the United Nations

Rodolfo Reyes Cuba UN(October 21, 2013) – Cuba endorsed today at the General Assembly of the United Nations Organization (UN) the claim of the countries of the Caribbean Community (Caricom) to their former metropolis for compensation for damage of the trans-Atlantic slave trade.Rodolfo Reyes, Cuban permanent representative to the UN, called the demand fair, which includes recognition by the powers that benefited from slavery such as France, Holland and the United Kingdom, of the atrocities resulting from this scourge, Prensa Latina news agency reported.

The ambassador recalled that the industrialized countries and their consumer societies are responsible for the accelerated environmental destruction, and have been the main beneficiaries of the conquest and colonization, slavery and the extermination of the peoples of the South.

They have also profited from the unjust economic order imposed on humanity (…). That rich and wasteful world has technical and financial resources to repay its debt to humanity, Reyes said in the Assembly that today tracks the theme of the celebration of the bicentenary of the abolition of slave trade.

Reyes added that his country claims the special and differential treatment required by the underdeveloped nations, especially in Africa, in their international economic relations.

Cuba rejects shameful selfishness and opulence (of a few) that serve as guidelines to ongoing globalization, he said.

Reyes announced the support and sponsorship of the island to the draft resolution presented annually by Caricom members and the African Group on the subject, as well as other related initiatives in the UN.

It’s the least that the international community can do to repair the crimes against humanity committed in the trans-Atlantic African slave trade, Reyes said and added that Cubans are proud of their African roots.

Source:  Cuban News Agency


Pan Caribbean Civil Society Reparations Network

Not since the Caribbean struggles for independence has the Region embarked on a journey of such magnitude and import for its future development and that of its people.

Communique issued at the conclusion of the First Regional Conference on Reparations

reparations(October 17, 2013) – On Sunday September 15th, the Caribbean Community opened the first Regional Reparations Conference at St. Vincent and the Grenadines’ Victoria Park.

The Conference was mandated by the historic, unanimous, decision of CARICOM Heads of Government in July, 2013, in Trinidad and Tobago.

The Heads of Government also requested each CARICOM Member State to set up its own National Reparations Committee to document the effects of European genocide against the indigenous inhabitants of the region, the slave trade in and the enslavement of Africans, and the colonization of the country.

The evening began with the unprecedented singing of St. Vincent and the Grenadines’ national anthem in both English and Garifuna.

 Source: 1804 Caribvoices.org | Read more at:  Pan Caribbean Civil Society Reparations Network


Drama at the UN: Caribbean nations sue for reparation

(September 30, 2013) – Here is what Al Jazerra America is reporting :

In a speech Friday at United Nations General Assembly, Prime Minister of Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Ralph Gonsalves said the European nations must pay for their deeds.

ralph gonsalves at the un

“The awful legacy of these crimes against humanity – a legacy which exists today in our Caribbean – ought to be repaired for the developmental benefit of our Caribbean societies and all our peoples,” Gonsalves said. “The European nations must partner in a focused, especial way with us to execute this repairing.”

The lawsuits – which are likely to amount to a lengthy battle – are being brought by The Caribbean Community, or Caricom, a regional organization that focuses mostly on issues such as economic integration. They will be brought to the U.N.’s International Court of Justice, based in The Hague in the Netherlands. It is not immediately clear when court proceedings will begin.

Read more at:  http://hiphopandpolitics.com/2013/09/30/drama-un-caribbean-nations-sue-reparation-us-walks-mugabe/

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‘Panama Papers’ conceals original source of Cameron family wealth: slavery

Cameron: ‘A grandson of the Jamaican soil who has been privileged and enriched by your forebears’ sins of the enslavement of our ancestors’ | TONY SEED

The Grange sugar estate in Jamiaca was a golden goose for its part-owner General Sir James Duff, an MP for Banffshire and Mr Cameron’s first cousin six times removed.

The Grange sugar estate in western Jamaica was a golden goose for its part-owner General Sir James Duff, an MP for Banffshire and David Cameron’s first cousin six times removed. Some 202 people, who had been bought like livestock for up to £300, remained in bondage there by the time of abolition, forced to rise at dawn and work days of back-breaking labour for the privilege.

The one British millionaire identified by the diversionary “Panama Papers” is the stockbroker father of prime minister David Cameron. He is deceased. Or rumoured to be.

The Guardian newspaper broke the story in the UK and led with the headline: “The secret $2bn trail of deals that lead all the way to Putin,” complete with a picture of the Russian president, whose name nowhere appears in the massive data leak. Continue reading

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Caribbean states demand reparations from European powers for slave trade

Most of the Caribbean nations have adopted a single plan to solicit from former slaving nations an apology, more aid and damages for 300 years of slavery, which have hobbled their economies and public health

Sugar Plantation Slaves 1858 engraving of slaves in the British West Indies working the sugar cane Photo: Lordprice Collection/ Alamy

PHilip Sherwell, Daily Telegraph (March 11) – A coalition of Caribbean countries has unveiled its demands for reparations from Britain and other European nations for the enduring legacy of the slave trade.

The leaders of 15 states adopted a wide-ranging plan, including seeking a formal apology from former colonial powers, debt cancellation, greater development aid as well as unspecified financial damages for the persisting “psychological trauma” from the days of plantation slavery. Continue reading

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