Tag Archives: Soviet Union – Red Army

77th Anniversary of the Start of the Warsaw Uprising August 1, 1944

The Treachery of Historical Falsifications | Dougal MacDonald

Monument in Warsaw, inaugurated in 1989, to those who fought in the 1944 Warsaw Uprising

Much has been written by historians about the Warsaw Uprising in Poland which took place from August 1 to October 2, 1944, during the Second World War.[1] Much of it is false. The main aims of the past and modern falsifiers of the history of the Warsaw Uprising have been to attack the Soviet Union and its great leader, Joseph Stalin, to whitewash the Polish reactionaries and their modern-day descendants, and to try to pretend that the innumerable Nazi war crimes which were committed against the Polish people were a mere historical footnote. But the facts of history are stubborn things and they do not change just because of the scribblings of reactionary historians.

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Of perpetrators, victims and collaborators (III)

Eighty years ago, Nazi criminals and Nazi collaborators started the first pogroms and murders of Jews in the Baltic States. Baltic collaborators are hounored today as “freedom fighters”. This fascist glorification is enabled by Canada and the United States who present themselves as the greatest opponents of “anti-semitism”. Third in a series.

Rally in Riga, Latvia opposes the annual march to rehabilitate Latvian members of the Nazi’s Waffen SS, March 16, 2017.

BERLIN (german-foreign-policy.com) – In the shadow of the invading Wehrmacht, German Nazi criminals started the first pogroms and mass murders of the Soviet Union’s Jewish population exactly 80 years ago together with Central and Eastern European collaborators. On June 24, 80 years ago, for example, pogroms began in the Lithuanian city of Kaunas under the eyes of Wehrmacht soldiers, in which German and Lithuanian perpetrators fell victim to 3,800 Jews by June 29.

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Of perpetrators, victims and collaborators (II)

Ukraine honours Nazi-collaborators, who, 80 years ago today, participated in the invasion of the Soviet Union and carried out massacres of Jews. This fascist glorification is enabled by Canada, the United States and Germany who present themselves as the greatest opponents of “anti-semitism”.

Stepan Bandera (in the centre) in Nazi uniform

BERLIN/KIEV (german-foreign-policy.com) – Whereas the German invasion of the Soviet Union 80 years ago is being internationally commemorated today, collaborators, who participated in the war of annihilation on the side of the Germans, are receiving state honours in Ukraine, in particular the Organization of Ukrainian Nationalists (OUN) and its leader Stepan Bandera as well as the Ukrainian Insurgent Army (UPA) which originated from that milieu. Together with the German Wehrmacht and troops from several collaborating states, OUN militias advanced onto Soviet territory, where they committed countless massacres of the Jewish population alongside German units. In Lviv (formerly Lemberg), 4000 Jews were assassinated within a very short period. The parliament in Kiev declared the OUN “combatants for Ukrainian independence.” A government decree calls for honouring their “patriotism” and “high morals” in Ukrainian schools. The UPA’s founding day has been a national holiday since 2015. The OUN salute adorns Ukraine’s football League’s jerseys.

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D-Day June 6, 1944. Normandy Landing and the re-writing of history

The decisive role of the Soviet Union in the military defeat of fascist Germany was accepted by everyone at the time, and admitted before Hitler’s suicide and the end of the war | François Lazure

Joseph Stalin, Franklin D. Roosevelt and Winston Churchill meet at the Tehran Conference, November 28 to December 1, 1943.

In an article published on the 70th anniversary of D-Day, military historian Benoît Lemay, of the Royal Military College of Kingston, Ontario pointed out, “There are many misconceptions about the Normandy landing. It is believed to have enabled the Allies to win the Second World War. A more nuanced view is required. In fact, in June 1944, Germany had already lost. The landing only served to accelerate the end of the war. It was the Russians on the Eastern Front who did most of the work. For propaganda reasons, during the Cold War years that followed, the West would try to minimize the Soviet effort. It would be conveyed that it was the Allies who did most of the work.”[1]

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D-Day June 6, 1944. Normandy Landing during World War Two

By Hilary LeBlanc

D-Day landing in Normandy, June 6, 1944.

On June 6, 1944, during World War II, an invasion force comprised of U.S., British and Canadian troops landed on the coast of Normandy, France. This date known to history as D-Day, refers to the long-awaited invasion of northwest Europe to open a Second Front against the Nazi forces of Adolf Hitler who had occupied France and most of Europe and had been waging a savage war against the Soviet Union. To that time, the Soviet Union had borne the brunt of the fight against Hitler. From 1941 to 1945, the Soviet peoples fought more than 75 per cent of the German and Axis forces and suffered the loss during the war, all-told, of more than 20 million people.

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Mother’s Day, May 9th and Mother

A reflection by Tony Seed

(Updated May 15) In truth, I confess that I never paid much attention to Mother’s and Father’s Day, perhaps due to the commercialism and false sentimentalism. As I grow older I am more attentive, especially this year of the pandemic, and more and more appreciative and respectful of my own mother and her strength, and the value of life. On her passing at the age of 93, we said “she moved the earth.” Continue reading

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78 years ago: 1943 – the year the tide turned in World War II

The Kursk Bulge, July 1943. Reserve troops moving to front | Fedor Levshin/RIA Novosti

 

By YURIY RUBTSOV

(May 8, 2018) – The peoples of Russia remember 1943 as the year that everything changed; a year of decisive battles that altered the course of the Great Patriotic War and World War II as a whole. It was the year of the Battle of Stalingrad, the Battle of the Caucasus, the Battle of Kursk, and the Battle of the Dnieper. It began with the lifting of the siege of Leningrad and ended with the Red Army’s liberation of two thirds of the Soviet territory temporarily occupied by the Nazis – 38,000 localities, including 162 towns. Continue reading

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This Day. Celebrating the great victory at Stalingrad by creating the new

“The Motherland Calls” statue at Volgograd Museum of the Battle of Stalingrad.

By DOUGAL MACDONALD

February 2, 2021 is the 78th anniversary of the great historic victory at Stalingrad. Stalingrad was the turning point of the Second World War and a major turning point in history. At Stalingrad, the united Soviet people led by Joseph Stalin and the Communist Party resoundingly defeated the Nazi invaders who had criminally attacked Stalingrad on August 23, 1942 with the largest military force ever gathered in one place. The battle ended with the encirclement of 300,000 German troops and a crushing irreparable defeat for the Hitlerites which eventually led to their total demise.

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On the frontlines: Red Army veteran Moritz Mebel talks about his battles against fascism

On the 75th anniversary of Victory Day, which commemorates the surrender of Hitler’s Germany in World War II, we bring you the recollections of Red Army veteran Moritz Mebel who took part in grueling campaigns against the Nazis from the gates of Moscow to the Czech RepublicMay 09, 2020 by Franziska Kleiner

Moritz Mebel (left) in Dresden in 1945.

Mebel and millions of his comrades from the Soviet Union were part of the longest and bloodiest struggles of World War II which ultimately caused the defeat of Hitler and fascism. Continue reading

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Canada and Russia’s common legacy: Victory over Nazi Germany

A Canadian gunner from the Canadian Film and Photo Unit (center) with two soldiers at the Elbe river in Torgau, Germany on April 27, 1945, just two days after US and Soviet troops link-up.

A Canadian gunner from the Canadian Film and Photo Unit (centre) with two soldiers at the Elbe river in Torgau, Germany on April 27, 1945, just two days after US and Soviet troops link-up.

by H.E. Ambassador Alexander Darchiev – Embassy of the Russian Federation in Canada

As Hitler’s lair in Berlin fell to the Red Army, and Nazi Germany unconditionally surrendered to the USSR and the Allied powers on the night of May 9th, 1945, the cruelest and deadliest war in the world’s history came to an end. 

This year we celebrate the 75th anniversary of this glorious date by paying tribute to our fallen heroes, and to the many millions of victims tortured and exterminated by the Nazi death machine. Continue reading

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This day. Liberation of Auschwitz – Imbue with new life the clarion call of Never Again!

On the occasion of the 75th anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz, we are republishing an informative article by Dr. Dougal MacDonald, University of Alberta lecturer,  for the information of our readers. Dr MacDonald is being publicly defamed as a “holocaust denier” by the Ukrainian Canadian Congress in collusion with Alberta Premier Jason Kenney and the monopoly media for arguing against the false narrative of a genocide committed in Ukraine by the Soviet state. The article, originally published in 2014, refers to the anti-social standpoint of the then Harper government, which has been continued by the Trudeau Liberals to date.

Memorial to the victims of Nazi atrocities at the site of the former Dachau concentration camp representing the demand of the world's people to never again permit the rise of fascism

Memorial to the victims of Nazi atrocities at the site of the former Dachau concentration camp representing the demand of the world’s people to never again permit the rise of fascism

(January 25, 2014) – On January 27, 1945, the advancing Soviet Red Army entered the Nazis’ Auschwitz II-Birkenau extermination camp, liberating more than 7,000 prisoners, most of whom were ill or dying. The prisoners were liberated as the Red Army was inflicting one defeat after another on the German troops, driving the Hitlerites steadily backward until the final demise of the Third Reich in Berlin on May 9, 1945. Continue reading

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Warsaw Uprising: Polish authorities’ political amnesia

By VALÉRY VRUBLEVSKY

People light flares as they observe a minute of silence to mark the 75th anniversary of the Warsaw Uprising against the Nazi German occupiers during World War II on August 1, 2019, in the Polish capital Warsaw | Janek Skarzynski/AFP

Poland is suffering political amnesia. The condition gets acute any time one mentions the mass crimes committed against Polish nationals. There is a plethora of examples to prove the case. The Volyn massacre is the most illustrative one. Ukrainian nationalists brutally tortured and killed dozens of thousands of old men, women and children. For all that, the Polish government supports the successors of Stepan Bandera who have seized power in Ukraine.

There is another example – the pogroms in Wola that took place during the Warsaw uprising (Wola – a district of western Warsaw). German fascists killed around 60,000 Poles in two days (August 5-6, 1944) – the largest single massacre in WWII. Continue reading

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75th anniversary of the Warsaw Uprising: The treachery of historical falsifications

When a city of almost one million people was nearly obliterated from the face of the earth

By DOUGAL MACDONALD

Monument in Warsaw, inaugurated in 1989, to those who fought in the 1944 Warsaw Uprising.

Much has been written by historians about the Warsaw Uprising in Poland which took place from August 1 to October 2, 1944, during the Second World War [1]. Much of it is false. The main aims of the past and modern falsifiers of the history of the Warsaw Uprising have been to attack the Soviet Union and its great leader, Joseph Stalin, to whitewash the Polish reactionaries and their modern-day descendants, and to try to pretend that the innumerable Nazi war crimes which were committed against the Polish people were a mere historical footnote. But the facts of history are stubborn things and they do not change just because of the scribblings of reactionary historians. Continue reading

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This Day. On the Victory Parade

June 24, 1945 – Historical Parade of Victory on Red Square in Moscow

In Red Square after the Victory Parade, 200 tall soldiers of the 3rd Regiment of the special battalion of the division named after F.E. Dzerzhinsky under the fraction of eighty drums stepped forward with two hundred banners of the defeated enemy. Each of the fighters has one fascist banner. Their sheets almost dragged along the wet pavement of the square. At the foot of the Mausoleum were two wooden platform. Having reached them, the fighters made a turn to the right and with a force threw at them the pride of the Third Reich. With a thud, the flagstaffs fell. Fascist panels covered the platform. Tribunes burst into applause. The fraction of the drums continued. In front of the Mausoleum there grew a mountain of enemy banners that were being brought to shame. The overthrow of the German flags was deliberately carried out with gloves in order to emphasize the aversion to the defeated enemy.

Over the years, this act, full of deep meaning, imprinted in photographs, posters, paintings, immortalized in books and films, has not faded.

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Behold Operation Bagration, D-Day of the Eastern Front

By JOHN WIGHT*

Map of Operation Bagration, showing the massive westward thrust of the Red Army.

Operation Bagration was the D-Day of the Eastern Front. In scope, size, scale and impact, it was a remarkable feat of arms unmatched in WWII.[1] Continue reading

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75th anniversary of D-Day: Attempts to sow divisions dishonour all those who fought together to defeat fascism

By NICK LIN

Allied casualties are helped ashore on the beaches of Normandy, France on D-Day.

June 6 marked the 75th anniversary of D-Day, June 6, 1944, when Britain and the U.S. opened a second front against Nazi Germany with a massive amphibious assault on the beaches of Normandy in occupied France. The Soviet Union, fighting with incredible resilience and sacrifice to the east, had long-awaited this development promised by its allies. It made its own contribution to D-Day with the coordinated Operation Bagration on the eastern front. Continue reading

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D-Day: The road to Berlin

 

British commandos land at Gold Beach on D-Day.

By STAN WINER*

WITH THE INVASION of Normandy on D-Day on June 6, 1944 the terms of warfare in occupied France ceased to be ostensibly those of Hitler and became clearly those of the Allied Expeditionary Force. The cross-channel build-up provided it with at least twice the number of men, four times the number of tanks, and six times the number of aircraft available to the enemy. Continue reading

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Normandy landing and the re-writing of history

In an article published on the 70th anniversary of D-Day, military historian Benoît Lemay, of the Royal Military College of Kingston, Ontario pointed out, “There are many misconceptions about the Normandy landing. It is believed to have enabled the Allies to win the Second World War. A more nuanced view is required. In fact, in June 1944, Germany had already lost. The landing only served to accelerate the end of the war. It was the Russians on the Eastern Front who did most of the work. For propaganda reasons, during the Cold War years that followed, the West would try to minimize the Soviet effort. It would be conveyed that it was the Allies who did most of the work.”[1] Continue reading

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75th Anniversary of D-Day: Deepest respects to all who contributed to the defeat of the Nazis in World War II

1944.06.06.FranceNormandieLandingCr

D-Day landing in Normandy, June 6, 1944.

This year marks the 75th anniversary of the World War II allied landing on the coast of Normandy, France, on June 6, 1944. On this anniversary, Canadians pay deepest respects to all the men and women who contributed to the defeat of the Nazis in Europe. Nearly 150,000 Allied troops landed or parachuted into the invasion area on D-Day, including 14,000 Canadians at Juno Beach. The Royal Canadian Navy contributed 110 ships and 10,000 sailors and the Royal Canadian Air Force contributed 15 fighter and fighter-bomber squadrons to the assault. Total Allied casualties that day reached more than 10,000, including 1,074 Canadians, of whom 359 were killed. Continue reading

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This Day. The 12 women who killed 775 Nazis

They defeated Nazis. Red Army female snipers in Berlin on May 9th, 1945.

1945.05.09.Red Army female snipers in Berlin

FROM LEFT TO RIGHT, FIRST ROW: V. Stepanova (20 kills), Y. Belousova (80 kills), A. Vinogradova (83 kills). SECOND ROW: E. Zhibovskaya (24 kills), K. Marinkina (79 kills), O. Maryenkina (70 kills). THIRD ROW: N. Belobrova (70 kills), N. Lobkovskaya (89 kills), V. Artamonova (89 kills), M. Zubchenko (83 kills). FOURTH ROW: N. Obuhovskaya (64 kills), A. Belyakova (24 kills). Total: 775 kills

It is estimated that in 1943 there were more than 2000 female snipers in the Soviet armed forces. Female snipers were credited with more than 12,000 confirmed kills.

For more information, read :

Feared female Soviet snipers, Nazi killers

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This Day. The Soviet-German Non-Aggression Pact, 1939

Official use of disinformation to falsify history and create a climate which will assist the same kind of Hitlerite and fascist forces to rise once again

Great Soviet victory against the Nazis at Stalingrad

On August 23, 1939, the Soviet Union signed what is now known as the Molotov-Ribbentrop Non-Aggression Pact with Germany which stipulated that Germany would not attack the Soviet Union and the Soviet Union would not attack Germany. The formal name for this agreement is the Nonaggression Pact between the USSR and Germany. It is often called the “Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact” or “Treaty” after the two foreign ministers who signed it. Ideological anti-communists call it the “Hitler-Stalin Pact”, in furtherance of the goal of associating the USSR to Nazi Germany and Stalin to Hitler.

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Demolition of anti-fascist memorials in Poland: Falsifications about country’s liberation from Nazi rule

Monument in Rzeszow celebrating the liberation of the city from the Nazis. In 2016 the city rejected calls from Poland’s historical legacy institute to remove such memorials.

By DOUGAL MACDONALD

On June 22, 2017, the Polish government’s lower house voted to amend the “decommunization laws” to demolish all monuments and memorials honouring the Soviet Union’s liberation of Poland from the Nazis. The fact that the amendments were passed on the 76th anniversary of the Nazi invasion of the Soviet Union would appear to be no accident. Continue reading

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Canadians uphold the cause of peace and freedom: Victory Day marches honour sacrifice of anti-fascist fighters

 Toronto, May 6, 2017

May 9, 2017 marked 72 years since the anti-fascist front of the peoples, with the communists, resistance movements and the Soviet Union at the head, achieved victory over Nazi-Fascism in Europe. At midnight, Moscow time on May 9, 1945 Germany signed its unconditional surrender to the Allied powers in Berlin. Since then, May 9 has been celebrated in the former Soviet Union and around the world as Victory Day to honour those who fought and sacrificed their lives to contain fascism and to repeat humanity’s call of Never Again! Continue reading

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Ghosts of the past: The story of Red Army captives in Poland

Soviet army greeted as it liberates Warsaw in 1945.

Soviet army greeted as it liberates Warsaw in 1945.

By Ekaterina Blinova

While the Polish government is preparing to demolish 500 monuments devoted to the memory of Soviet soldiers who died liberating Poland from the Nazi invaders, another disturbing historic episode comes to mind – the story of tens of thousands of Soviet prisoners of war tormented in Polish captivity back in the 1920s. Continue reading

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71st anniversary of the Victory Over Fascism

The overthrow of the imperialist system is the only guarantee for peace

The red flag is raised over the German Reichstag in Berlin by Red Army soldiers on May 2, shortly before the surrender of German forces in the city and the decisive victory over the fascists on May 9, 1945. | RIA Novosti

The red flag is raised over the German Reichstag in Berlin by Red Army soldiers on May 2, shortly before the surrender of German forces in the city and the decisive victory over the fascists on May 9, 1945. | RIA Novosti

On May 9, 1945 the anti-fascist forces of the world with the Soviet Union and communists of all lands at the head of the Resistance Movement declared victory over the Hitlerite Nazis. On this memorable day 71 years ago, fascist Germany acknowledged defeat and declared unconditional surrender. Continue reading

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Polish city refuses to demolish monument honouring WWII Red Army soldiers

RT.com (April 21) – The city of Rzeszow, close to Poland’s border with Ukraine, has ignored calls to remove a Soviet-era monument celebrating the liberation of the city from the Nazis. Last month, Poland’s historical legacy institute urged the immediate removal of 500 such memorials across the country. Continue reading

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Feared female Soviet snipers, Nazi killers

Lyudmila-Pavlichenko-2

Major Lyudmila Pavlichenko of Ukraine – her total of confirmed kills during World War II was 309, including 36 enemy snipers.

“In Canada she was presented with a sighted Winchester rifle now on display at the Central Armed Forces Museum in Moscow. While visiting in Canada along with Vladimir Pchelintsev (fellow sniper) and Nikolai Krasavchenko (Moscow fuel commissioner) they were greeted by thousands of people at Toronto’s Union Station.”
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Dresden and Poznan: Two different ways to wage war

The Liberation of Poznan by the Soviet Union

The Liberation of Poznan by the Soviet Red Army

By YURIY RUBTSOV

The Red Army and British-American forces had one enemy – the German Wehrmacht – but quite often they waged different wars. The liberation of the Polish city Poznan by the Red Army and the bombing of Dresden by [other Allied countries] – one event following one week after the other – 70 years ago in February 1945. These two examples provide a good illustration of this. Continue reading

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This day. Historic victory at Stalingrad

February 2, 2016, is the 73rd Anniversary of the victory of the battle for Stalingrad. Articles from TML Weekly in 2013 discussed its significance on the occasion of the 70th anniversary.

Memorial Complex to the Heroes of the Stalingrad Battle, located at Mamayev Hill, in Volgograd (the present-day name of Stalingrad), Russia.

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‘Operation Unthinkable’: Churchill’s planned invasion of the Soviet Union, July 1945

By YURI RUBTSOV*

In late May 1945, Josef Stalin ordered Marshall Georgy Zhukov to leave Germany and come to Moscow. He was concerned over the actions of British allies. Stalin said the Soviet forces disarmed Germans and sent them to prisoners’ camps while the British did not. Instead they cooperated with German troops and let them maintain combat capability. Stalin believed that there were plans to use them later. He emphasized that it was an outright violation of the inter-governmental agreements that said the forces surrendered were to be immediately disbanded. The Soviet intelligence got the text of a secret telegram sent by Winston Churchill to Field Marshall Bernard Montgomery, the commander of British forces. It instructed to collect the weapons and keep them in readiness to give back to Germans in case the Soviet offensive continued. Continue reading

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