Tag Archives: Transport Canada

This Day. 7th anniversary of Lac-Mégantic tragedy – The need to build a public authority that defends public not private interests

By Pierre Chénier

July 6, 2020 marked the seventh anniversary of the Lac-Mégantic tragedy, one of the worst train disasters in Canadian history. 

On the evening of July 5, 2013, a freight train comprised of five locomotives and 72 tanker cars, unsuited for the type of crude oil they carried, was left unattended in Nantes, in Quebec’s Eastern Townships. At around 1:00 am the train started to roll down the slope towards the town of Lac-Mégantic. Shortly after, 63 of the tanker cars derailed in downtown Lac-Mégantic, spilling their contents and causing a series of fires and explosions of catastrophic proportions. Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under Canada, History

Six years on from the train explosion in Lac-Mégantic: A shocking account of criminal negligence

The report and interview in this issue of Renewal Update provide a shocking account of the criminal negligence of governments and the self-regulating railway companies.

The terrible memory of what happened in Lac-Mégantic is still fresh in people’s minds, with local residents still reeling from the experience. Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under Canada

Vigorous day of action to defend maritime jobs against neo-liberal free trade with Europe

(January 20, 2017) – On January 12, sailors, longshoremen, seaway and other workers took part in militant demonstrations against the neo-liberal Canada-European Union Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA). Demonstrations were held in St. John’s, Montreal, Toronto, Vancouver, Victoria and Prince Rupert. In St. John’s, the action was held at the constituency office of MP Seamus O’Regan. In Montreal, the action took place in front of the constituency office of Transport Minister Marc Garneau. In Toronto, workers marched to the constituency office of Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland (who oversaw the CETA file while International Trade Minister). In Vancouver, workers protested at the constituency office of Liberal MP Hedy Fry, while in Victoria the action took place at the docks in Ogden Point, and in Prince Rupert workers rallied at the Transport Canada office. Continue reading

1 Comment

Filed under Canada, No Harbour for War (Halifax), Working Class

Militarization of Canadian ports: Violation of rights of Maritime workers and annexation in the name of ‘security’

By TONY SEED

REPRESENTATIVES of Canadian maritime port workers have denounced draconian “security” measures aimed at criminalizing their rights. Under the aegis of the “war on terror” of the Bush administration, the federal government announced by executive order on 16 November 2006 that maritime port workers in Canada will be required to pass background checks. News agency reports are vague about both the origin of the demand and the content of the new Marine Transportation Security Regulations. Continue reading

1 Comment

Filed under Working Class

REFLECTIONS ON THE PRESTIGE OIL DISASTER: (Part 3) ‘Don’t make me fish off Cape St. Mary’s’

The tourism ads hype Newfoundland as “the Far East of the Western world,” but its waters are the waste-oil dumps of the Northwest Atlantic

By TONY SEED and GARY ZATZMAN

Part Three of a four-part series. Part One is here, Part Two is here, and Part Four is yet to be published.

HALIFAX  (March 25, 2004) – THERE ARE 365 islands in Newfoundland’s Placentia Bay. Fog reduces visibility to less than a kilometre an average 187 days a year. Hundreds of oil tankers – almost 300 in the year 2000 alone – enter that body of water and its prime fishing grounds, along with dozens of small fishing boats manned by crews who come from families that have fished the bay for centuries. The amount of shipping will be intensified with construction of the new Inco hydrometallurgical demonstration plant in Argentia in Placentia Bay to process concentrate from Voisey’s Bay, Labrador. It is scheduled to open in 2006. Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under Canada, Fisheries & fishermen