Tag Archives: Falsification of history

‘How was such a fool your US ambassador?’ Tamimi family mocks Israel’s secret probe into whether they’re real Palestinians

deliberately costumed in clothing that Americans could relate to like backwards baseball caps. “If that’s your elite, I’m not sure how you manage to beat us” | Yotam Berger,  Haaretz

The Tamimi family | Alex Levac

(January 25) – The four members of Ahed Tamimi’s family who are not in detention were amused to hear that the Knesset had conducted an investigation into whether the Tamimis are a real family. Continue reading

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Erasing history: Israeli state archives kept secret

Files in the Israel State Archives|Ofer Aderet

Ninety-five per cent of the Israeli state archives are concealed from public access. The suppression of history is a precondition for the all-round falsification of history of the enforced dispossession of the Palestinian people – “to make possible the Zionist lies about ‘a land without a people for a people without a land’ and to weaken Palestinian resistance as much as possible.” The state’s own chief archivist has condemned the widespread censorship of historical documents containing information that the public has a right to know about | Four articles 

Haaretz Editorial (January 18) – It was hard to believe that the manifesto posted this week on the website of the Israel State Archives was written by a state official subordinate to the Prime Minister’s Office. The text, by the outgoing chief archivist, Dr. Yaakov Lazovik, gives expression to all those values that the state has been trying to destroy in recent years – democracy, liberalism, humaneness and transparency. Continue reading

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Warmongering meeting on Korea in Vancouver: Canada is being disingenuous

Canada will co-host along with the United States the “United Nations Command Sending States Meeting” in Vancouver on January 16, as part of what U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson calls “the pressure campaign against North Korea.” Preparations for this event began prior to November of last year. Under the guise of supporting a rules-based international order, the meeting brings together the original 21 aggressor countries that sent troops to wage the brutal war against Korea between 1950 and 1953.[1] The war against Korea took the lives of over 4 million Korean citizens and amongst other crimes, razed the city of Pyongyang to the ground. Continue reading

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Centenary of the Halifax Explosion: Time to disturb the sleep of the unjust

Act of God, the harbour pilot, the navy?

The Halifax Explosion and the Royal Canadian Navy: Inquiry and Intrigue

John Griffith Armstrong
(Vancouver: UBC Press, 2002)
Hardcover, 256 pp, 6 x 9 inches, 16 b/w photos, maps
Index, Bibliography and Chapter end-notes
ISBN 0-7748-0890-X
$39.95
New in Paperback: July, 2003
ISBN 0774808918 $24.95

Reviewed by GARY ZATZMAN*

Painting of the Halifax Explosion

Was it an “accident”? Did the harbour-pilot do it? Why did the British Admiralty send such a dangerous ship into the harbour of Halifax in the first place? Why was it diverted from New York? Why did the Americans and the French load explosive cargo in such a way? How much did the navy know – and when did they know it? The Halifax Explosion of 6 December 1917, the most destructive man-made explosion before the dropping of The Bomb, left half the population homeless, levelled residential areas of the working class, the poor, parts of the African-Nova Scotian community at Africville and the Mi’kmaq community at Tufts Cove, discredited the reputations of a number of officials and continues to inflame controversy to this day. John Griffith Armstrong’s The Halifax Explosion and the Royal Canadian Navy: Inquiry and Intrigue heaps another faggot on this fire. Focusing on the official inquiry following the disaster, Armstrong clarifies the role and responsibility of the Royal Canadian Navy (RCN). Continue reading

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Imperialists’ morbid preoccupation with defeat on display at Halifax War Conference

During the Halifax International Security Forum the people of Halifax affirm No Harbour for War!

The Halifax International Security Forum met in Halifax, Nova Scotia from November 17 to 19. The annual conference brought together over 300 participants from more than 80 countries to discuss the theme: Peace? Prosperity? Principle? Securing What Purpose? Continue reading

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Plunder and erasure – Israel’s control over Palestinian archives

“The essay discusses one characteristic of colonial archives – how the ruling state plunders/loots the colonized archives and treasures and controls them in its colonial archives – erasing them from the public sphere by repressive means, censors and restricts their exposure and use, alters their original identity, regulates their contents and subjugates them to colonizer’s laws, rules and terminology. It focuses on two archives plundered by Israel in Beirut in 1980s: the Palestine Research Center and archive of Palestinian films. Continue reading

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Inappropriate Parks Canada celebrations at Manoir Papineau

Patriots who refused to conciliate with the Crown after the defeat of the rebellion faced death or deportation. In the drawing above a British officer reads the order of expulsion, to which the Patriots clench their fists and cry out, “Treachery!”

By Chantier politique

On May 17, the federal government, through Parks Canada, announced the kick-off of Canada 150 celebrations at Manoir Papineau in the town of Montebello in the Outaouais, named after Louis-Joseph Papineau who betrayed the Patriots. We often hear of those who betrayed the revolutionary movement of the Patriots of 1837-38 and accepted “reasonable accommodation” with the Crown after the Rebellion was brutally crushed. The “reasonable accommodation” allowed them access to positions in the government and the institutions to defend their own right to private property and even to the seigneurial rights they enjoyed under the French regime. They reconciled with power not to defend and pursue the struggle for recognition of the Republic as is often claimed, but to defend the British monarchy and its institutions which betrayed and continue to usurp the right of the people to be sovereign. Continue reading

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